DIY-ing Can Swing Both Ways

… just like our shower door. But more on that later.

It’s Evan again! Sorry for the long absence from the blog, but Katelyn has been an doing an awesome job writing about our adventures in the meantime. I’m here with just a quick update on a DIY project that came up a little short.

Sometimes it’s the little details that get you. It started with a quick fix idea I had for our shower. See… the door leaks water out every time we use it. Probably because there are huge gaps all around our nice thick glass swinging door.

DIY-ing Can Swing Both Ways- evanandkatelyn.com

I went to the amazing amazon and got a door sweepdoor gap closer (technical terms here only), and some fancy tape to keep it water-tight.

To start with I had to trim these polycarbonate strips to length. Note: you should really practice cutting them a few times before the final one. The good news is that they come way longer than the length you need (ours arrived in a tube twice the size of Katelyn). I used my jig saw to cut them. You could also use a little hacksaw if you wanted though.

DIY-ing Can Swing Both Ways- evanandkatelyn.com

As you can see I clamped it down since I do not have three hands (one to hold the jig saw and two to hold either end).

DIY-ing Can Swing Both Ways- evanandkatelyn.com

Mine came out a little rough so I sanded the ends down:

DIY-ing Can Swing Both Ways- evanandkatelyn.com

Once cut to length it is easy to slip them on the shower door (you just have to make sure you get the right width plastic guards so that they are snug but still slide on).

DIY-ing Can Swing Both Ways- evanandkatelyn.com

 Good news: I tested out the shower and the guards protected against the water leaking out!

DIY-ing Can Swing Both Ways- evanandkatelyn.com

Look! No puddles on this side of the door!

Now for the bad news. Remember when I mentioned that our door swings both ways? And that it is heavy? When it swings closed, it does so with such momentum and force that it hits the plastic water guard and shakes both glass panes so hard I worry for their mountings! So… success and failure. The plan worked great but it was a little (well… kinda a huge) detail that literally STOPPED the project from being a success. Not sure where we are going to go from here. We can either take the guard off and have a leaky shower or keep it on and always have to remember to gently shut the door behind us. Or there could be a third solution out there. Slow down the door swing somehow? Stop the leaks another way? Have any suggestions? Keep checking back with us and hopefully we’ll revisit this conundrum later.

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2 Responses to DIY-ing Can Swing Both Ways

  1. Quentin April 19, 2017 at 11:30 am #

    Did you figure anything out for this?

    We just bought a house and the master bathroom shower came with the door sweep on the glass that the door closes to. The door swings shut pretty hard on it’s own. The glass piece is no longer held in place on the bottom by the sealant.

    I have a couple ideas:
    1. soft-close shower door hinges
    2. use a more flexible door sweep (so the door can pass it and oscillate back and for until it closes… this assumes the door hinge has a spring and is set to the correct position). The soft door sweep would even slow down the swinging of the door and should get it back to the right place faster… hopefully.

    Unfortunately…

    The only soft close hinges I see out there are:
    http://www.houzz.com/photos/12594052/Coastal-Paragon-Series-Soft-Close-Shower-Door-Hinges-One-Pair-Polished-Chrome-modern-tub-and-shower-parts

    …only $595…

    or this:
    http://www.houzz.com/photos/12605066/Paragon-Soft-Close-Shower-Door-Hinges-Glass-2-Wall-Pair-Polished-Chrome-modern-hinges

    for “just” $329…

    They say the more expensive one lasts for 10000 cycles. So about 13.5 years if you open and close it twice a day (shower once)… or 7 years if you shower twice a day. Might be worth it actually, $600 in 7 years?

    Not sure how long the cheaper one lasts.

  2. Katelyn Sheline April 26, 2017 at 6:52 am #

    What we ended up with in the end is we kept the sweep on the bottom of the door, which allows it to move but adds some friction so it doesn’t swing as fast, and then we removed the one we tried to use vertically between the swinging door and the glass (it just closed too hard). The small amount of water that sprinkles out through the door gap bothers us less than the slamming glass door haha. Hope this helps!

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