Hole-y Patchwork Batman!

Hey y’all. You remember our double the leaks, double the fun post from the other week? Welp, I’m back to continue the story of how we fixed our leaks but managed to destroy a good chunk of our ceiling in the process. I mean look at that poor thing.

IMG_7189 But we decided hey, we’ve never drywall patched anything larger than a few inches across, this will be a great learning experience! So we did some Googling to figure out what we needed: a panel of drywall, drywall tape, drywall mud, a mud pan, and a taping knife. When we got to the store, we had the option of either buying a 2ft x 2ft drywall piece or a full size 4ft x 8ft panel. We opted for the smaller one. 

So before I get into a how-to, I’ll preface it by saying we didn’t totally do things correctly. Even though our hole could be covered by the 2 foot drywall square, we probably should have cut even more of the ceiling out because it was visibly bowing down in the middle. See that 2×4 nailed to our ceiling? We had hoped that if we nailed a straight board through our curved ceiling and into a ceiling joist, it would help straighten out the bow.

Long story short, that technique didn’t work. The bowing part of our ceiling reached all the way past two light fixtures, and we really didn’t want to have to cut around both of them. But turns out, trying to make a flat panel of drywall match a slightly bowed ceiling was probably more difficult than just dealing with the lights.

IMG_7194

Even though the patch and the ceiling didn’t quite match up due to the bowing, we figured we could make up the difference with drywall mud. At least that’s what we kept telling ourselves. Especially once we were too far in to turn back haha.

But anyways, back to how we did what we did. First we held the drywall square up to the ceiling and traced around it. Evan cut along the line we traced with his sawzaw so we had a clean edge that the drywall square could fit right up into.

IMG_7192

That square did overlap one of our recessed lights, so we traced the light hole onto a sheet of paper and then used that paper to trace a circle where the light would be on our drywall piece.

IMG_7199

We held the square up to the ceiling and screwed it into a couple ceiling joists. Then we added another sliver of drywall because our hole was just a hair too wide.

IMG_7205 Next we added our drywall tape. We did a few runs of tape over each seam to make sure it was nice and secure.

IMG_7209 IMG_7208 You can see pretty well in the photo above how bad the gap was.

IMG_7212 Then came the fun part: mudding. Evan did the first layer. He could just slop the mud up on there messily because we didn’t need to get it perfectly smooth (our ceiling is textured).

IMG_7213 We let that dry and then I swooped in to add some texturing. Matching it ended up being easier than expected too. After I spread on a nice thick layer, I loosely wrapped a plastic grocery bag around my hand and patted it into the mud. This created a texture super close to the one our ceiling had and we didn’t have to buy any extra tools!

IMG_7227 IMG_7221 Unfortunately, texturing couldn’t cover that gap. Although we had taped and mudded over the gap, and structurally it was fine, there was still a noticeable bump at either side of the patch. So we had to add another coat of mud and cover up my beautiful texturing hard work.

IMG_7224 IMG_7223 After letting this next layer of mud dry, I went back and added more mud just near the gaps/bumps to smooth out the transition, texturing it again as I went. I repeated this process a few times: mud, texture, dry, mud, texture, dry.

IMG_7238 I’d like to say I got it to a point where the patch wasn’t noticeable. I’d also like to say that I workout every morning, always take my vitamins, and fully understand how to work our printer. But none of those things are true.

IMG_7240 But by this point, we’d been at it all day (lots of drying time!) and we called good enough good enough. I primed and painted it using one of those handy ceiling spray paint cans and that definitely improved the look.

Oddly enough, these days we don’t even really notice it. So either our ceiling’s patch is really not that terrible, or we’re just becoming blind to it. Win win? Haha.

IMG_7606 I think what we learned on this one is sometimes it’s more work to attempt a shortcut than it would have been to do it the right way. Thanks DIY universe for teaching us this valuable lesson *bows*.

, , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply