DIY 2×4 Side Table

We made this side table out of 2x4s for less than $9, which we think is pretty dang cool! We did it as part of the Modern Maker #two2x4challenge and it was definitely a challenge! You could make this table with other types of wood and the steps will be easier (2x4s tend to warp and pine is soft), but the cheap material allowed us to experiment with some joinery techniques we’d never done before. We learned a lot and shared lots of little tidbits (and failures!) in the video.

[Before we keep going, I want to pause and say if you have a sec it would mean SO much to us if you’d subscribe to our channel or share our video. We’re new to YouTube, so every view, like, and sub makes a huge difference for us. Thank you!]

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn

We’ve included free plans that have a cut list and measurements. The video and this post will go into more details, but the plans are a great reference for the nitty gritty numbers. 

Here’s what you’ll need:

Materials:

Tools:

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn

Squaring & the 2x4s

We started by giving our 2×4’s a nice square edge on all sides. The rounded edges they come with make it difficult to get a finished looking end product.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn We ran the top and bottom of them through the planer.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn Then we ran the left and right sides through the table saw, and then through the planer.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn We did this before cutting them to length because we thought that would make all our boards more consistent, but it was a little unwieldy running 10-ft boards through a table saw. So it might be easier to cut them first (leaving extra length that you can trim off later).

Cutting & making panels

After squaring them up, we cut the 2x4s to length for our top panel, shelf, and legs on our miter saw. You can find the lengths and cut list in the plans we linked to earlier.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn Everything got 10 degree miters: The legs are angled at 10 degrees, which means their ends need a 10 degree cut; and the shelf buts up against the legs so it therefore needs a 10 degree cut too. Technically, you could cut the top panel at 90 degrees but we thought 10 degrees would look nice, so that one is purely aesthetic.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn Next we glued up the panels for our top piece and our shelf piece. We used Titebond Original wood glue here and Bessey clamps. We also have a little silicone brush that is awesome for applying the glue. We let these set overnight.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn Then we ran our two panels through the planer one more time to level out any unevenness from our glue up.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn Unfortunately, we got some snipe on the ends, which is when your board isn’t in contact with both rollers at the same time and the planer cuts the ends a little deeper.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn

We fixed this by running it through again and again with sacrificial boards in front of and behind it until we got rid of the snipe.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn

Cutting dados

This part was a little tricky since we’ve never cut dados before. We angled our table saw blade to 10 degrees and raised the blade so it would cut about halfway through the thickness of our boards. There are dados in a few different places: two in the underside of the tabletop for the legs to go into, and one on the inside of each leg for the shelf to sit in.

We started with the tabletop. We measured where the outside of each dado needed to be and made marks at those points. We started our cuts there and worked our way inward.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn We thought we’d widen our dado a little bit at a time and test fit the legs with each pass as we got close.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn We tried to be careful, but we still cut our first dado a hair too big. Womp.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn We cut new legs for that side and it ended up being fine (you can’t visibly tell a difference in the leg thickness), but we did learn to stop a little early with our cuts. An extra snug fit is ok, and you can use a wood mallet to pound the wood into place if it’s tight. Luckily, our second dado under the tabletop was fine.

We tried to be careful, but we still cut our first dado a hair too big. Womp. Next we cut a dado on the inside of each leg. We actually did all the legs together to make sure the dados were consistent. We again used the method of marking where the dados needed to start and working our way down little by little.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn To clean up our dados, we used a router with a ½” diameter dovetail bit and a chisel. The bit got the flat surfaces really well, and the chisel helped clean the corners (plus it was super satisfying).

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn

Assembly

With our dados cut, it was time to assemble. This table is put together with just wood glue, no screws involved. Unfortunately, when we started to assemble it we realized our shelf panel had warped a little.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn 2x4s are prone to warping, so if you use nicer wood you hopefully won’t have to worry about this happening as much. Luckily we were able to force it into place during our dry fit assembly.

However, it took us about 15 minutes to pound everything into place with that warped shelf, and our glue (Titebond III) has a set time of 10 minutes, so we literally had to race the clock for this assembly. If you don’t have any warping it won’t be as much of an issue.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn All the pieces need to be assembled simultaneously. We applied glue to our dados, roughly put the legs where they need to be in the tabletop dados, sat the shelf in the leg dados, and used a mallet to inch everything into place. We clamped everything together and let the glue dry overnight.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn

Finishing

The next day, we unclamped our piece and gave the whole thing a good sanding using a random orbit sander for the large surfaces and sanding blocks to get into harder to reach spots.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn Then we used wood filler at each joint to fill in any gaps we couldn’t close before the glue set. We let it dry and sanded it off.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn Next we gave it two coats of shellac and sanded lightly with 600 grit sandpaper between coats. If you are too heavy handed with the sanding or use too low of a grit, you’ll sand the shellac right off.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn After the shellac, we gave it a coat of Briwax, which we then buffed off by placing a microfiber rag between our random orbit sander and the table. The finish came out reeeeally nice. It’s got some shine but isn’t overly shiny, and it feels super smooth.

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn

Done!

We love how this side table turned out! Like we said earlier, this build would probably be easier with nicer, more expensive wood, but this was a great challenge and the cheap material really allowed us to experiment with some new techniques. Please let us know if you have any questions about this build. Thanks!

DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn DIY 2x4 side table for just $9 - Evan & Katelyn

………………………………………………………………

You can also find us at:

YouTube…………….. https://www.youtube.com/evanandkatelyn
Instagram………….. http://instagram.com/evanandkatelyn @evanandkatelyn
Instructables………. https://www.instructables.com/member/evanandkatelyn/
Facebook………..….. https://www.facebook.com/evanandkatelyn/

………………………………………………………………

Note: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting us!

0

DIY Marquee Letters

Hey guys! So, if you were familiar with our blog before we got started on YouTube, you probably remember our DIY Marquee Letters tutorial of yore (here’s part 1, part 2, and part 3). We built them for our wedding and they were actually the first DIY project we ever started. I say “started” because we didn’t complete them until months later, but still – I count them as the first!

We still get comments and questions about these letters, so we thought doing a video tutorial would help show how we made them. Plus, since this is our second time around and we have a few years of DIY experience under our belts, we came up with some ideas to make a couple tricky parts easier. So check out the video above to see the tutorial! And if you wanna see a budget breakdown, scroll to the end.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn

[Before we keep going, I want to pause and say if you have a second it would mean SO much to us if you’d like our video or subscribe to our channel. Since we’re brand new to YouTube, every view, like, and subscription makes a huge difference for us. Click here to see the whole channel. Thank youuuuu! We’re doing a big goofy happy dance right now!]

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn

So if this looks like something you want to tackle, here are the steps in the video broken down. You can also look at the old 3-part tutorial linked to above, but this version has the updates we made and is a little more succinct (since we did it in a weekend instead of over a 6-month period haha)

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn

Materials

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn

Tools

Step 1: Making guides

This step is a tiny bit of up front work that is going to make things way easier later in the project. We’re going to make a few wooden blocks to use as guides. We didn’t do this the first time we made these DIY marquee letters, but they helped so much this time around.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn First, we cut four 2-5/8″ long blocks out of some scrap 2x4s. These will hold up the letters to the correct height for nailing in the metal flashing later. We used our miter saw, but a jig saw works too, just cut slowly (and maybe use a clamped-on straight edge to guide you).

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Next we’re going to make a height guide to help us nail in the right location. We cut another piece of scrap wood to be 3-3/8″ long and drew a line at 2-5/8″. This will show us where the plywood is from the outside of the flashing.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Both of these measurements are based on using 3/4″ plywood. These guides will make more sense once we get further along in the project, but trust us, you’ll want to have them!

Step 2: Making the letters

We made printable templates for every letter (you can download them here). These are PDFs that will print out on several pages and be the right size to cut out a 2-foot tall letter. We taped together the template, which is easier said than done, at least when you have a cat.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Then we cut out the outline of the letters, taped them onto our plywood, and traced around them using a yardstick as a straight edge.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Before removing the paper, you’ll want to use the hole center guide we included in the template download to mark where to drill each hole.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn NOTE: The lights we used are a pack of 25. Our E and K had 25 total holes. If the letters you chose have more than 25 holes, you might need reduce the amount of holes and eyeball how to space them out OR look for a bigger set of lights.

Line up the center template with each circle on the letters, then either use a center punch or tap a nail a few times into the center mark.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn When you remove the paper templates, you’ll be left with tiny starter holes to show you where you need to drill.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn We drilled through these using a 13/16″ spade bit, but you could also use a forstner bit or hole saw. We’d recommend double checking the diameter of the socket part of your lights before doing this. You want it to be a snug fit.

Sometimes drilling all the way through in one go can cause a little tear-out. It’s not a huge deal because the back of the letters will never be seen anyway, just make sure you’re drilling into the front of the letters. Or you can play it safe like we did by drilling halfway through the letters from the front, then flipping them over and drilling the rest of the way through.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Next we cut around the outlines of the letters with a jig saw. This is easiest to do if you have a couple clamps to hold the wood still, but we made the first set without any. Carefully guide the jig saw around the outline of your letters.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn There might be a couple places where you need to turn a corner and can’t, like the inside cuts of our E. Just drill a hole along the line you need to cut, then place the jigsaw blade in that hole and start cutting along that line.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Woohoo, at this point things are starting to take shape!

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn

Step 3: Sanding and staining

Before staining them, we’re going to give the edges a quick sand. For the outside edges of the letters, we used a 220 grit sanding sponge because it’s easy, flexible, and can contour to the edges a bit.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn We used little scraps of 220 grit sandpaper to sand inside the holes we drilled.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Then we applied one coat of Minwax stain in dark walnut. To keep the coat of stain even, Evan applied it and I wiped off excess as he went. This prevents it from pooling or soaking in too much in some areas and coming out splotchy. It’s not 100% necessary to do it this way, but we think it helps. Don’t worry about staining the edges or inside the holes, they won’t be visible when you’re done.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn

Step 4: Adding metal flashing

This next part, adding the flashing, was definitely the hardest step the first time we did this project. But because we made those scrap wood guides earlier, it’s gonna be a lot easier this time. Go ahead and place your first letter on the 2-5/8″ scrap wood blocks to raise it up off your work surface.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn First we sketched out our letters and measured all the sides, writing the measurements down on our sketch. We planned for the flashing to start at the middle of the bottom of each letter, so the first measurement is just a partial length and we allowed for some overlap at the end.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn We start our flashing at the bottom of each letter and plan for a little overlap We used those measurements to pre-bend the metal flashing. We’ve found the easiest way to do this is to grab a hammer and a sturdy (thick) putty knife, and find yourself something cushy to work on, like carpet. Because we were working outside, we used our doormat. Having your flashing on a cushioned surface lets the putty knife sink into it when you’re hammering.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Put on some gloves (the flashing is sharp). Measure from the end of the flashing to where you need to make the first corner on the letter and draw a line at that point.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Then align the edge of the putty knife with that line, and hammer the handle so that it indents the metal.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Once you’ve given it a few whacks of the hammer, you should be able to bend it easily by keeping the putty knife edge in the crease and folding the metal against it by hand.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Every time we made a bend, we made sure to a) measure the side of the letter again just in case before bending, b) make sure we were bending in the right direction (bending inward or outward), and c) test fit the bend to make sure it fit the letter before moving onto the next bend. We caught a couple measurement mistakes on our end, so we definitely recommend playing it safe!

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Here’s what we mean by corners that bend inward toward the letter.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn And here are the corners that bend outward away from the letter.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn If you do happen to make a bend in the the wrong spot or in the wrong direction, you can undo it. Lay the metal against a hard surface and hammer the bend flat. Then you can re-bend it in the correct spot/direction.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn When you have all your bends made and everything fits, it’s time to secure the metal to the wood. This is where the guides we made are going to come in handy. The blocks we made earlier hold the letter up to the correct height so that when the flashing is wrapped around them, the plywood is centered in the flashing.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn And the 3-3/8″ block will show you, from the outside of the flashing, where the plywood is so that you can nail into it.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn The first time we did this project, we were trying to simultaneously hold the flashing centered with the plywood and hammer into it at the same time. It was not the easiest thing in the world. So trust us when we say these guides will save you!

Another thing that made the project easier this time around is having a nail gun. We haven’t used it much so we did have a slight learning curve, but once we got the hang of it it made nailing the flashing into the wood much faster. We used the outside height guide to show us what height to make the nails at, and we ended up cutting a little notch in it with our jigsaw to even use it as a place to rest the nail gun so our spacing was more consistent.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn However, this is totally 100% doable with just a hammer and finishing nails. It’ll take a little more time, but it’s not difficult. We recommend nails that are only 3/4″ or so so you’re not hammering forever. Use the height guide to line the nails up with where the plywood is and hammer them in.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Whichever method you use, it definitely helps to have one person hold the letters secure while the other nails into them.

If a nail goes through your wood don’t worry, just pull it out with pliers, sand over the rough spot where it exited the wood, touch it up with a dab of stain, and re-hammer in the nail. Just think of it as added character.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn There will be a few areas you can’t nail into because a hammer or nail gun won’t fit. We secured these with super glue. We used gorilla glue last time, but in our opinion, super glue was easier.

Some places won’t need nails or glue (like the tight corners of the K), but other places will (like inside the E).

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn We dabbed some super glue in between the metal and wood, then used scrap wood and rubber bands to hold them tightly together. You may not need to do this step at all, it all depends on your letters. You can also often bend the metal so that it’s bowing against the wood, which holds it against it. But adding a little super glue is easy in a pinch.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn And congrats! You’re done with the hardest part!

Step 5: Adding lights

The last step is adding the lights. All in all, this is pretty straight forward. Just unscrew the bulb, pop the socket through the hole, and screw the bulb back in.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn We had 25 lights and 25 holes, so we made sure that a light was used in each one. This meant we had to do a little back tracking on the legs of the letters. Where you have to backtrack, skip every other hole on and then fill the ones you skipped on your way back. See how I skipped the holes on the leg of the K? I’m going to fill those on the way back up.

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn Annnnnnnnd done!!!!

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn We are so happy to have another set of these DIY marquee letters, and this set was WAY easier to build than our first. Maybe that’s a testament to the skills we’ve learned over the past few years, or maybe it was just because while making the first set we were also trying to fix up our newly bought house and plan a wedding at the same time haha. Either way, we’re super pleased with how these came out.

They are perfect for a wedding (we might be biased) but would also be awesome for an engagement shoot, baby shower, party, or even just as home decor. We have our set that spells LOVE in our living room and they make us happy every day. Hope you enjoyed our DIY Marquee Letters tutorial!

DIY wood and metal marquee letters - Evan & Katelyn

Budget breakdown

Materials

Tools (the required ones only, we used other things just because we had them. Also, I’ve linked to both the versions we have and more budget friendly versions. We tend to invest a little more in tools because we use them all the time, but if you want to save the less expensive versions below all got good reviews)

………………………………………………………………

You can also find us at:

YouTube…………….. https://www.youtube.com/evanandkatelyn
Instagram………….. http://instagram.com/evanandkatelyn @evanandkatelyn
Instructables………. https://www.instructables.com/member/evanandkatelyn/
Facebook………..….. https://www.facebook.com/evanandkatelyn/

………………………………………………………………

Note: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting us!

1

3D Printed Deer Head for Casey Neistat

Today’s project is a little different. It’s something we made not for our own house, but as a gift. It’s something that isn’t like most of the projects we post because it’s not really a tutorial exactly. BUT it’s something we feel strongly about and are excited to share, so let’s get into it :)

We made a 3D printed deer head for Casey Neistat!

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn So if you know what we do, and you know what Casey does, this might seem kinda random. The content we have on our channels doesn’t have much overlap. But if it wasn’t for Casey… we might not even have a channel. 

In the video below, we explain what we mean, but in a nutshell: We’ve always loved DIYing and sharing what we do, but Casey inspired us to take it to the next level by starting a YouTube channel and devoting as much time and energy as we have to building our passion into something more. This deer head design was, in a way, the kick off point of us taking what we do from just a hobby to something more, so it’s very special to us and we wanted to share it. Hope you like it Casey :)

[Before we keep going, I want to pause and say if you have a second it would mean SO much to us if you’d like our video or subscribe to our channel. Since we’re brand new to YouTube, every view, like, and subscription makes a huge difference for us. Click here to see the whole channel. Thank youuuuu! We’re doing a big goofy happy dance right now!]

Now, I’ll try to cover the steps we took to make this deer but there will be a few things that won’t be possible unless you have 3D printer access. So feel free to read along if your’e curious about any of the steps, or watch the video above if you just wanna see the process in action.

Making the backing

First things first, we had to find some pallet wood for the backing. We went to a tiny local hardware store in the area to see if they had some pallets we could take off their hands.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn We’ve never salvaged pallet wood before (which is kinda a DIYer right-of-passage, right?) so we were excited to get our hands on this. We went for salvaged wood over new lumber because we wanted it to have a bit more wear and tear, and not look so perfect.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn We used our reciprocating saw to cut the ends of the wood  from the ends of the pallet, and pried off the nails from the middle of the pallet.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn 3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn Then we joined three pallet boards using our Kreg jig.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn And once they were joined, we cut off a little bit from each end on the miter saw so that the top and bottom were even

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn 3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn

Printing the deer

Meanwhile we started 3D printing a big deer head. We designed this guy a while back (modeled in MODO) and sell smaller version on Etsy and at West Elm stores here in Texas (like I said, it’s really the first project that kicked off this adventure), but we wanted something slightly larger with some more oomph. So Evan got to work making the design even bigger (mainly in SolidWorks).

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn After a few failed prints, we got Fred to handle the larger deer size (Fred is our new printer, if you follow us on Insta you’ve met him before) and he came out beautifully. We’re still trying to fine tune Simplify 3d (the software that tells the printer what to do) and getting the supports to stick is sometimes an issue.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn He was printed in three different pieces, meaning we had to join those pieces. Evan designed him with holes at each connection point so that we could attach the pieces with dowels and super glue.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn We may have initially put the wrong antler on the wrong side, and we may have panicked a little, but he’s good now :)

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn 3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn Then we had quite a bit of surface area to smooth out. 3D prints are often printed with supports that you break off when the print is finished. Breaking off the supports leaves a rough patch. So we smooth those out with a combination of a soldering iron and coats of automotive primer (sounds weird if you haven’t worked with 3D prints before, but it does the trick!)

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn After the rounds of priming and soldering, we spray painted him a dark gunmetal color.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn

Painting

Next we painted the backing. The goal was to do something colorful with a bit of a street art vibe. First we spray painted the same gun metal gray we used on the deer on the top and bottom of the pallet to give it even more of a weathered look.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn Without waiting for it to dry, we started adding strokes of acrylic paint in layers upon layers. We used about ten different colors.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn 3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn 3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn We also added a little 3D printed touch: Casey’s tattoo DO MORE. We glued the 3D printed text over the paint.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn 3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn Lastly, I had to hide a little YouTube icon in the details. This is Casey after all.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn

Assembly

Lastly we drilled a hole through the backing and mounted the deer.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn Here’s the finished product y’all!

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn 3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn 3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn Of course, we also had to figure out a way to mail this guy from Texas to New York. We bought the most economical box we could that was double walled and big enough for the deer. Turns out “most economical” means “most awkwardly sized” so we actually got this big thing and cut it down to a smaller size

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn 3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn Of course, we had to make the box our own. Couldn’t help but doodle on it.

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn Then we shed a few sweaty, happy tears, said our goodbyes and mailed him off. Hope he makes it to NY ok. Hope Casey likes him. If we’re lucky, maybe we’ll get to see him again on Mail Time :)

3D printed deer head for Caset Neistat - Evan & Katelyn If you wanna see him on Mail Time too… make sure to let Casey know! Please send him the video link on Twitter @CaseyNeistat. Casey is one of our biggest creative inspirations and it would mean so much to us knowing that our gift made it to him. Thank you!!

Tools and materials

If you’re trying to tackle a similar project, we wanted to still include the tools and materials we used. Here goes!

………………………………………………………………

You can also find us at:

YouTube…………….. https://www.youtube.com/evanandkatelyn
Instagram………….. http://instagram.com/evanandkatelyn @evanandkatelyn
Instructables………. https://www.instructables.com/member/evanandkatelyn/
Facebook………..….. https://www.facebook.com/evanandkatelyn/

………………………………………………………………

Note: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting us!

 

0

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post

A while back we built a horizontal cat scratching post/pad and shared it on the blog. Mochi did use it, but the downside is she still clawed our couch too. Womp.

So we built a modern vertical cat scratching post that slides over the arm of our couch, hoping that giving her something vertical to pull on will spare our couch from further damage. And so far, she’s using it!!! Yay!!! Bonus, this thing also acts as a wooden couch sleeve to set your drink on. Double yay!!

Of course, we documented the whole build on video so if you’d like to see the action in video form check it out!

[Before we keep going, I want to pause and say if you have a second it would mean SO much to us if you’d like our video or subscribe to our channel. Since we’re brand new to YouTube, every view, like, and subscription makes a huge difference for us. Click here to see the whole channel. Thank youuuuu! We’re doing a big goofy happy dance right now!]

Tools & materials

Before I get into this build, I’ll preface it by saying we used a lot of tools on this simply because we had them at the ready, but you don’t need everything we used. So I’m gonna put the must-have tools at the top of the list, and additional stuff we used below.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com Must-have tools/materials

Additional tools/materials we used (helpful, but not 100% necessary)

Step 1: Measure & cut the 2 vertical pieces

This scratching post is made of three pieces. To start, we’re going to find the measurements we need for our two vertical pieces (numbers 1 and 2 below). All the measurements for this build will depend on your couch.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com Because couch arms can be rounded, grab a scrap piece of wood, or anything flat really, and place it across the top of the couch arm, making sure it’s level. Then measure the distance between the floor and the underside of the scrap piece.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

This measurement is going to be the length of your longer vertical wood piece that goes on the outside of your couch arm.

https://www.youtube.com/user/EvanAndKatelyn

Next, slide the yardstick between the arm of your couch and the cushion until it hits the base of your couch under the cushion.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

This measurement is going to be the length of your shorter vertical wood piece that goes on the inside of your couch arm.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

We used these two measurements to cut two pieces from our 10×1 on the miter saw. You could definitely use a circular saw instead though, or heck even a jig saw or hand saw.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

On the shorter piece, we also added a slight taper by cutting an angle on our miter saw so that it would slide between the cushions more easily. It’s optional, but it does help.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

Step 2: Pocket holes

Next we drilled pocket holes. If you don’t have a kreg jig don’t worry, you can just screw perpendicularly through the boards with wood screws later to attach them (don’t do it til after you’ve attached your sisal though. We’ll cover that part later). If you want to try the kreg jig but aren’t sure how to use it, here is a great tutorial on it.

We drilled these at the top of both vertical pieces, on the inside part that will be facing the couch arm. We’ll use them to attach the top piece later.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

Step 3: Attach the sisal

Next we wrapped the longer vertical board (the one on out outside of the couch arm) with thick 3/8″ diameter sisal rope. We used most of this 100 foot roll which is pretty crazy. DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com Because it’s so thick, we had to wrap the board first before we could get an accurate measurement of how wide our top piece needs to be.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

We attached the sisal in such a way that if she really goes to town on it and at some point we need to replace it, we can easily do so. First we drilled a hole at one end of our longer piece of wood.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

Tape the end of the sisal and thread it through the hole so that the taped end is on the pocket hole side of your board.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com We secured the sisal by screwing through it and into the wood. First drill a small pilot hole, making sure to NOT go all the way through the wood.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com Then screw through the taped end of the sisal and into the pilot hole. Make sure you use a small enough screw that won’t go all the way through your board (we used #8 x 3/4” wood screws).

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com Next we rounded out our edges with the router and ⅛” radius roundover bit. Eventually we are going to round pretty much every edge except those that are joined together, but for now we just rounded out the edges of the piece that will have the sisal because we wanted to do it before we wrapped it.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com As we started, we realized we should have rounded these edges BEFORE we attached the sisal because it actually got in the way of the router. So we had to detach it, round the edges, and then reattach it.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com After reattaching the sisal, we got started wrapping it tightly around the board. It helps to have a buddy for this part because our arms actually got surprisingly tired haha.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com We attached the end of the sisal the same way we started it, by drilling a hole through the wood, threading through the sisal, and screwing it to the board on the pocket hole side of the wood (the same side we screwed the starting end to)

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

Step 4: Measure & cut the top piece

Next we are going to measure out and cut our top piece of wood.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com First we put the two vertical pieces in place.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com We made sure they were level, then measured the distance between the outside edge of each board.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com We cut that length on the miter saw, but again, use whatever saw you’ve got.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com Before attaching the top piece, we rounded the corners of the rest of our edges. Like I mentioned before, we wanted to round out everything but the edges that we would join together.

Step 5: Sand & smooth

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com Then we sanded out surfaces so that everything was smooth because it’s a lot easier to do before everything is assembled. We used the random orbit sander on the large surfaces and hand sanded it with a sanding block on the edges.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

Step 6: Attach everything

We used right angle clamps to keep the boards as square as we could before attaching them. In the picture below, we’re attaching the top piece to the shorter vertical piece

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com We screwed through our pocket holes using pocket hole screws. If you didn’t do pocket holes, this is where you could screw wood screws perpendicularly through the boards.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com When it came time to attach the long vertical wood piece, the dang sisal was in the way again so we had to get creative with some additional clamps and scrap wood in order to clamp the boards at a right angle. But we figured it out and screwed through those pocket holes as well.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com Yay, all attached!

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

Step 7: Finishing

Next we rounded out the corners of our top piece so that they matched up with the rounded corners of our side pieces. You can see in this picture where some edges are still sharp, and some are already rounded.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

Then we rounded the rest of the top piece. You could potentially do all the edge rounding at once, we just thought it was easier to do it as we went.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com We noticed there were a couple slight gaps where our pieces joined together. So we filled them with sanding dust from our sander and some glue. This is a great alternative to wood putty, and it’s guaranteed to match the color of your wood. Add more dust if you need to, and sand it to finish.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com A trick to get your cat interested in the scratching post is to spray it with catnip spray. It’s sorta cheating… but it works! We also like to scratch on it with our hands to help show her what it’s for.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

If all your measurements were correct (cross your fingers!) this should slide right over your couch arm.

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com She’s spotted it…

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com She actually likes it!!! Eeeeeeep!!

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com We definitely like this new scratching post more than our old one. It feels a little more finished looking, and we don’t have to worry about stubbing our toes (although we’ll still hold onto the old one for a while)

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

Hope she continues to like and use it! Please, Mochi, please use it, for the sake of our couch…

DIY Modern Cat Scratching Post - evanandkatelyn.com

………………………………………………………………

You can also find us at:

YouTube…………….. https://www.youtube.com/evanandkatelyn
Instagram………….. http://instagram.com/evanandkatelyn @evanandkatelyn
Instructables………. https://www.instructables.com/member/evanandkatelyn/
Facebook………..….. https://www.facebook.com/evanandkatelyn/

………………………………………………………………

Note: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting us!

0

Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison

We’ve been doing more and more woodworking over the past year, and our arsenal of tools and equipment has grown steadily. We’ve always been pretty safety conscious (thanks to Evan, who always has to remind me to put on my eye/ear protection, respirator, etc) but with the increased dangerous-equipment-usage, we’ve been feeling the need to up our safety game even more. Enter the Push Sticks.

[Before we keep going, I want to pause and say if you have a second it would mean SO much to us if you’d like our video or subscribe to our channel. Since we’re brand new to YouTube, every view, like, and subscription makes a huge difference for us. Click here to see the whole channel. Thank youuuuu! We’re doing a big goofy happy dance right now!]

Basically, a push stick is a tool you use when you’re working on a table saw to be able to a) keep your hands farther from the spinning blade of doom, and b) give yourself more control to safely maneuver a piece of wood through said spinning blade of doom. There are two common styles out there that were popularized by Matthias Wandel and John Heisz, so we made each of those versions and tried them for ourselves.

The Wandel version is based around the idea of using two long-handled push sticks. You hold them pretty far back, which keeps your hands quite far from the blade. One is used to push the wood forward, and one is used to hold it from the side and keep it straight. Because of how you hold each of them, you tend to stand a little more to the side which means you’re less likely to get hit if there’s a kick back.

 Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com

The Heisz version is designed in a way that applies forward and downward pressure at the same time so that you have solid control of the wood without having to apply as much force yourself (meaning you’re less likely to fall forward toward the blade). It also has a log of surface area that touches the wood and feels like it gives you great control.

 Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com

Here’s what you’ll need:

Step 1: Print, cut, and glue template

The first step was to download the templates. We printed them out, roughly cut around their shapes, and glued them to the wood.

 Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com  Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com

Step 2: Cut out push sticks

We cut out our push sticks on our band saw, but you could do it using a jig saw as well. The band saw gives you a little more control though, so if you’ve already got one, that’s what we’d recommenD.

 Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com  Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com

Step 3: smoothing and sanding

This step is optional. We decided to round out our sharp edges (and imperfections because yours truly got a little carried away on the band saw) using a 1/8″ roundover bit. This mainly gave us some smoother to hold onto. We also sanded these to get them even smoother, plus sanding removed any paper we couldn’t pull off and the remaining glue residue.

 Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com  Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com  Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com  Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com Done!

And that’s it! These guys are super easy to make. But I know what you’re all wondering… which one did we end up liking better?

First we tested the Heisz version…

 Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com Then we tested the Wandel version…

 Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com And our favorite is… the Wandel push stick! We ultimately chose it because we felt less scared using it, which is a totally personal perception. But you could push the board farther without having to get close to the blade at all, which was nice, and having that secondary stick to help guide the wood made us feel a little bit more in control.

 Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com With the Heisz version, we had to reach our arms over the blade to push the wood all the way through, which we weren’t crazy about. Although we DID like how much more surface area of the push stick was in contact with the wood using the Heisz push stick.

 Wandel vs Heisz push stick comparison - evanandkatelyn.com In the end… I think we’re actually going to try and make our own, using what we liked from each design. Stay tuned for a video and post covering that soon!

Note: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting our blog!

 

 

 

 

0

Abstract Painting Tutorial

We both grew up with art as an important part in our lives and love that when we want to change up our walls we can grab a canvas, brush some paint on it, and have instant new art. But if you’re not super comfortable with a paintbrush in your hand, that can be kind of intimidating. So we set out to create an abstract painting tutorial that you can do even if you don’t consider yourself a painter. As proof, we convinced my mom (who doesn’t paint) to give it a try and see if she could follow along. Results = success!

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com

We used acrylic paint (which we think is the easiest paint to work with) in just two colors, and topped it off with shiny copper tape that adds an instant geometric punch. We are super excited for you guys to try your hand at painting too!

This video covers everything step by step (it really helps to watch Evan’s brush in motion), and we’ll go into even more detail below.

[Before we keep going, I want to pause and say if you have a second it would mean SO much to us if you’d like our video or subscribe to our channel. Since we’re brand new to YouTube, every view, like, and subscription makes a huge difference for us. Click here to see the whole channel. Thank youuuuu! We’re doing a big goofy happy dance right now!]

Materials needed:

Step 1: Wet your canvas

The first step (that might not be an obvious one) is to brush water across your canvas. The water is going to help the paint blend. If the canvas is try, it tries to grip onto the paint and makes everything less smooth. You just want a very thin layer of water (the canvas should glisten but there shouldn’t be any pooling).

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com

Step 2: Add background

We’re going to use just two colors in this tutorial: Titanium White and Payne’s Gray. You could easily swap these around (white and blush would be really pretty too, or white and teal)

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com Get mostly white on your brush and just a little bit of gray. You don’t want to mix them too much because you’ll just end up with a really light gray. Instead, you want white with streaks of grayish blue to end up on your canvas. So get both on the brush without mixing them.

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com At this point, do all vertical up and down strokes until everything looks smooth and you have some nice blue striation mixed into the white.

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com

Step 3: Add variation

Next we are going to add some variation in the form of left and right strokes, stronger concentrations of gray, and stronger concentrations of white. We like an asymmetrical look, so we are going to add some darker gray areas in the bottom right, top left, and bottom left.

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com We mix in some horizontal strokes with our vertical strokes by cross-hatching them so that not all the brush strokes are going in the same direction.

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com And then we blend these additional marks so there aren’t hard edges (this is personal preference, you can leave it less blended if you prefer it that way). When you apply color you should hold your brush at about a 45 degree angle, but when you blend you should hold it much lower, about a 20-30 degree angle. Make your brush strokes very light handed, letting the weight of the brush pull the paint but not really applying too much extra force on top of that.

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com The blending step is much easier to understand in video form. The good news is, there’s really no right or wrong way to do it. If you look at Evan’s painting and my mom’s painting, they both look a little different and it’s totally ok.

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com

Step 4: Add copper tape

After letting it fully dry (we wait a couple hours), you’re going to add the copper tape. First we drew out a few different patterns that we could lay our tape in. We recommend doing this to decide on your tape pattern before you actually place your tape.

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com Again, there’s not really a wrong way to do this. I tried like 20 options and I think any of them would have worked. We will say for this more minimalist look, 3-5 lines probably works best.

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com To apply the copper tape, first unroll and cut off the amount you need, leaving a little extra on each end to wrap around the edges of your canvas. The cut off piece wants to curl, so we straightened it by bending it agains the direction it wanted to curl. Remove the backing carefully so that it does not stick to itself, and pull tightly (but not so tight you break it!) across your canvas. Press down onto your canvas and wrap the tape around the edges.

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com And you’re done!

So the reason this works so well as abstract art, even for beginners, is that the copper tape is what your eye focuses on and the painting acts as a backdrop for that. So even if you’re not super confident in your painting skills, don’t worry, it won’t be the main focus. Heck, you could even just do a solid color backdrop.

Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com Abstract Art Painting Tutorial - evanandkatelyn.com So please give this a try and let us know how it goes! We’d love to see how it turns out, so tag us on Instagram @evanandkatelyn if you end up posting pics!

Note: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting our blog!

 

0

Living room mood board – I wish!

Spring (aka it’s all of a sudden 85 degrees down in Texas) has us imagining changes around here! Full room makeovers may not be in the cards for us right now, but I recently started helping a friend put together a mood board for her living room (hi Lisa!) and it made me think – what would our dream living room look like? It’s been so long since we did ours, how has our style changed? *dives deeply into the Pinterest rabbit hole*

I’ve actually only put together a legit mood board ONCE (and I don’t even think we shared it on the blog). Ironically, I’m prettttyyy sure it was for our living room haha. (Which I’m realizing now I really need to share again because the post I linked to up there is years old. Wow.) Anyway, I’m excited today to share what our ideal space would look like! Who knows, maybe this will spur a few changes around here :) Natural modern living room - evanandkatelyn.com

My overall thoughts

So I’ll walk ya through why I chose what I chose in the hopes that maybe it’ll get your brains turning too. Overall, I wanted to go for something that had modern vibes and clean lines (the couch, coffee table, lamp, art) but with lots of natural materials/textures (woven rug and baskets, leather couch, plants) to warm it up and a little whimsy thrown in (marquee letters, fun pillows).

Art ledge

I’ll start at the top. I’ve been wanting to do an art ledge for-like-ever. I’m obsessed with the one made by Chris and Julia. You can buy these, but check out their tutorial for a super easy DIY walk through. I’m thinking a dark walnut one would be gorgeous. Speaking of C & T, also fell in love with the large tree rings print from Minted they hung on their dark shiplap wall. That piece because the starting point for the art ledge. I went with black and white to give the space contrast but also be a neutral backdrop for the color I wanted to bring in elsewhere. Our current living room art is super colorful, which I loved for a long time, but I’m craving more neutral pieces up on my walls now.

Natural modern living room - evanandkatelyn.com
01. Visionary print

02. Sum Total print

03. Tree Rings print

04. Staredown print

05. News Flash print

06. Art ledge – tutorial here

Couch, furniture, plants

I wanted to go neutral and natural with the furniture pieces. We LOVE our Lounge sectional, which is an L shape, but something U shaped is oh so appealing (PS this one is from Arhaus and I’m kinda loving how sizable and sturdy their living room furniture looks. Like it’s not gonna blow away and you could probably jump on it without worry haha). I wanted other furniture pieces that were a little more delicate (but also sizable!) to balance the big sectional, so I went with the gold coffee table and gold standing lamp, which tie into each other. Plus I wanted a glass coffee table so you could see the pretty rug underneath. I also had to throw in a couple plants… both faux because I have a black thumb, but of course if you can keep a plant alive go for something living! I also loved the tiny wood vase on the coffee table plant, and the big basket is one I already own and luh-uh-uhv.

Natural modern living room - evanandkatelyn.com

 

07. Faux fiddle leaf fig

08. Dune three-piece sectional

09. Gold tripod floor lamp

10. Large curved basket

11. Gold and glass coffee table

12. Faux eucalyptus plant

Pillows, marquee letters, chair

This… is my favorite little section of the mood board. I wanted some fun and whimsy in the pillows. That winking one had me at hello ;) (Bonus- it’s embroidered, not printed, which gives it a little extra texture!). I also love how the boho style pink and red pillow ties into the rug without being too matchy matchy, and the gold spotted pillow ties in with the coffee table and lamp (it’s embroidered too!). The marquee letters we made for our wedding… those are part of our ideal living room no matter what. They were our first big DIY project and we’re still obsessed with them. And that handsome leather chair is pretty much the best of all worlds – modern, warm, and some masculinity to balance the pillows.

Natural modern living room - evanandkatelyn.com

13. Agda printed yarn pillow

14. Dot embroidered throw pillow

15. Winky embroidered throw pillow

16. Marquee letters – check out our tutorial here

17. Axel leather armchair

Rugs

I love the layered rug look. Love. I’ve had googly eyes for Persian rugs ever since we got a few little ones for the house. This big one has my name all over it. It’s a bit more expensive than I would normally pay… but this is a dream moodboard right? Plus to balance it, the jute rug underneath is super reasonably priced (and huge!). So it all evens out right? Natural modern living room - evanandkatelyn.com

18. Hand-woven natural area rug (11×15)

19. Persian rug (9’9″ x 13)

Hope you guys found this mood board helpful! Any other styles or rooms you’d be interested in seeing? Let us know below or on Insta (@evanandkatelyn)

Not gonna lie – a) had a ton of fun making this, b) I want to immediately buy everything in this room now, and c) was kinda hesitant to publish because now I know somebody else is gonna snag that rug.

………………………………………………………………

You can also find us at:

YouTube…………….. https://www.youtube.com/evanandkatelyn
Instagram………….. http://instagram.com/evanandkatelyn @evanandkatelyn
Instructables………. https://www.instructables.com/member/evanandkatelyn/
Facebook………..….. https://www.facebook.com/evanandkatelyn/

………………………………………………………………

Note: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting us!

0

DIY easy concrete letters

We are kinda sorta obsessed with these little concrete letters. Mainly because a) they’re really easy to DIY because there’s no mold-making required, and b) leaving messages around the house is kinda awesome.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Hehehehehe.

So today we’re gonna walk through this quick tutorial. And after this you’ll be looking around your house for other stuff you can pour concrete into (it’s kind of addicting).

You can watch the video that covers everything below, or keep scrolling for all our choices, steps, and tips in blog-format.

[Before we keep going, I want to pause and say if you have a second it would mean SO much to us if you’d like our video or subscribe to our channel. Since we’re brand new to YouTube, every view, like, and subscription makes a huge difference for us. Click here to see the whole channel. Thank youuuuu! We’re doing a big goofy happy dance right now!]

Here’s what you’ll need for the project

  • Quikrete Vinyl Concrete Patcher
  • Small mixing container (you could use something like this or even a solo cup works if you’re just doing a few letters)
  • Stirring and scooping devices (we use an old ladle to scoop dry concrete mix, a metal rod to mix it, and a plastic spoon to scoop it into the letters. But chances are, you’ve got something on hand already that will work)
  • Silicone letter baking mold
  • Gloves (we really like the thick 9 mil gloves)
  • Mask
  • Plywood or some sort of board (it protects your work surface and makes it easier to get concrete to settle into your mold – we’ll get into that later)
  • Concrete sealer (optional)
  • Paint or spray paint (optional, but we used gold Krylon)

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com If you’ve watched any concrete tutorials before, you may notice we’re using a sliiiightly different product from the norm. This was a choice we made for a few reasons:

  1. It has a really fine grain so the ending surface finish is really nice – no big lumps or rocks
  2. It fills into more detailed shapes more easily than some concretes
  3. Bonus – it comes in a smaller batch than most concrete mixes, which is nice

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Before you start, place plywood (or anything else similarly stiff and board-like) over your work surface. This not only protects your table from the potential mess, but it’s also gonna help you agitate the mold too (don’t worry, we’ll get into that later).

Make sure you have your PPE (personal protective equipment on) before you start handling the concrete mix. Portland cement is very basic (opposite of acidic), and has crystalline silica dust (which is really bad for your lungs). If you get cement on your hands and leave it there it can cause minor chemical burns and draws out moisture from your skin. If you do get cement on your hands, no worries. Wash with water, then pour common white vinegar over the area to neutralize any alkalinity, then wash with water again.

Start by adding a small amount of water to your mixing container. It’s important to add water to the container first before adding any mix. We started with about 50 ml but ended up adding more later.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Then add a few ladles of mix. The Quikrete instructions say to use 7 parts concrete mix to 1 part water, but for this project we found that to be too dry. We added a splash or two more water (a little goes a long way!) and kept mixing.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Side note, adding more water DOES weaken the concrete slightly. Which you definitely wouldn’t want if you were making anything that needed to be structurally sound or hold weight. But for this small decorative items, the slightly wetter concrete is so much easier to work with so we think it’s worth it (we’ve made a ton of these by the way – no breaks so far)

It’s easy to add too much water though. So here’s a tip to check and see if you have too much. Agitate the mixing container, and excess water will rise to the surface. We do this by quickly hitting the insides of the walls of the container back and forth with our stirring stick (you can see this better in the video).

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com This should cause extra water, if there is any, to rise to the surface. If you see water pooling a little at the top, add a little more concrete mix, stir it around, and agitate the container again to test for more water.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Once there’s not more excess water and your concrete is about the consistency of a sandy milkshake (I know, sounds so appetizing), you’re good to go. (In total, you’ll need to mix for 2-3 minutes to make sure everything is incorporated).

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Once your mixed concrete is ready, spoon it into the letters of the mold that you want to make. Heads up – some letters don’t stand up on their own too well (like P and F for example, which are asymmetrical and top heavy) but that doesn’t mean you can’t still use them (see our “POOP” example above…. hmm that’s something I never foresaw myself saying).

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com You’ll want to overfill the letters a little. The concrete will settle down into the mold.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Now you need to agitate the mold to get out any air bubbles. This is where the plywood comes in handy. We like to shake and drop the plywood with the mold on top of it, since the plywood is a lot sturdier to grab onto than a silicone mold full of wet concrete. You can still agitate the mold itself by scooting it quickly side to side, but I wouldn’t pick it up or anything. Again, this is easier to visualize in video format.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com You’ll see the bubbles rise to the surface. You can pop them with whatever stirrer or scooper you have on hand, then give the mold another good shake to see if any more come up.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Honestly, we kinda like the look of a few bubbles… it adds some interest. But you don’t want a ton or it’ll be a weaker end product.

Scrape off any excess concrete off the top (we used a popsicle stick, but again whatever you have around is fine, just something with a flat edge). You can give it one last shake which should smooth out your scraped-off surface.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Then… you just have to wait. These take about 24 hours to dry.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Before we take them out of the mold, you have the option to apply a concrete sealer to the backs of them (the side you can see when they’re still in the mold).

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com This step is totally optional, but this side of the letters tends to be a little dusty and the sealer will help lessen the dust. Since we do a lot of stuff in concrete, we already had the sealer, but if you don’t want to buy it just for this purpose your letters will be fine.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com If you do want to use it, apply a thin coat and let it dry for about an hour (we’ve done half an hour… but if you want to play it safe, wait the full hour). Then you can remove your letters, yay!

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com The back edge might be a little rough, so chip off any rough edges with your finger.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com I know the last thing you want to hear is that you need to do any more waiting… but you have to do a little more waiting. 24 more hours to be exact. They continue to cure once they’re out of the mold because air is able to reach areas that were previously encased. You can see the difference between a freshly de-molded set of letters and one that is fully cured in the photo below.

Keep them on a surface that can be messy, like your plywood from earlier or simply sitting on top of the molds. If you put these on something absorbent, they’ll leave moisture spots.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Ok… after your long week of waiting, you can finally use these suckers! They’re super cute as is but there are tons of creative ways to paint them too. I love love love giving them a metallic ombre look.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com To do this, put on a glove (so you don’t spray your fingers) and hold the top of the letter, spraying the bottom half with your spray paint of choice. I try to spray about 8 inches away. The farther you spray, the more of a fade your ombre will have. Vice versa, the closer you spray the less fade you’ll have. You can test it on some scrap wood, cardboard, piece of junk mail, etc.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Other ideas we love are giving it a dipped look by painting the bottom third with gold leaf paint or crisp white acrylic, but I feel like you could experiment with lots of different techniques and styles. If you end up making these, take a photo of what you did and tag us @evanandkatelyn on Instagram because we would LOVE to see what y’all come up with!

And lastly, if you like the look of these but actually messing with concrete is not your thing, you can also buy these on our Etsy. We sell the LOVE as a set, but shoot us a message and we can make whatever letters you want. Like your home state…

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Favorite food…

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com Or spirit animal.

DIY easy concrete letters using baking molds! evanandkatelyn.com ………………………………………………………………

You can also find us at:

YouTube…………….. https://www.youtube.com/evanandkatelyn
Instagram………….. http://instagram.com/evanandkatelyn @evanandkatelyn
Instructables………. https://www.instructables.com/member/evanandkatelyn/
Facebook………..….. https://www.facebook.com/evanandkatelyn/

………………………………………………………………

Note: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting us!

3

Simple DIY cutting board

We’ve been wanting to get into hardwoods lately. We’ve done some “light” woodworking in the past (like this simple side table we made or our DIY marquee letters), but we’ve always just used whatever cheap wood we could find at Home Depot.

Don’t get me wrong – there is a lot you can do with inexpensive framing lumber, plywood, etc, and we will continue to use it I’m sure. But for this project, we needed to get our hands on something a little more specific/fancy/drool-worthy.

Enter the DIY cutting board. Our excuse to get our hands on something really really nice.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com

You can watch the video that covers everything below, or keep scrolling for all our choices, steps, and tips in blog-format.

[Before we keep going, I want to pause and say if you have a second it would mean SO much to us if you’d like our video or subscribe to our channel. Since we’re brand new to YouTube, every view, like, and subscription makes a huge difference for us. Click here to see the whole channel. Thank youuuuu! We’re doing a big goofy happy dance right now!]

We originally wanted to make these cutting boards as gifts and/or to sell on our Etsy shop, but we liked them so much we couldn’t help but turn this into a tutorial too.

So pretty much as soon as we could, we found the closest lumberyard and got our butts over there. Side note, we realized that lumberyards are often closed on weekends and evenings, so if you work full time like we do you might want to check their hours before you drive all the way over there *cough* learn from our mistakes *cough*.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com (sorry about the bad selfie quality!)

Walking in, we had a “a whole new wooorrrld” moment. It was amazing, we could have stayed there all day. Literally, they had to politely ask us to to make our purchase and head out because they were closing. But enough about our lumberyard adventure, let’s get to the real meat of this tutorial.

Here’s what you’ll need

Side note, we’ll be making a face grain cutting board, which is often the prettiest and easiest, but is not the most durable option. We will be making another tutorial for an edge grain or end grain cutting board soon though which are more durable but more difficult to make, so keep your eye out.

Wood selection is key in this project. There are a few different things you need to look for when choosing it. It needs to be:

  • Durable
  • Food safe
  • Close grained

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com Some good options we came across in our research are maple, cherry, and walnut. Maple is on the cheaper end, so we started with that (note: we’ve since gone back and made another out of walnut too and it’s preeeety).

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com When picking your board, check for damage and flatness/straightness. Damage is pretty obvious, just know that even little imperfections that might be ok in other projects will cause you extra headache on this cutting board, like little dinks in the wood or a cool knot.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com A good way to quickly check for flatness is to look down the length of the board at a steep angle and see if it still looks straight. The steep angle amplifies any changes in the straightness. If it looks bendy or wavy at all, see if you can find a straighter piece.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com We ended up choosing an 8-inch wide piece of hard maple. Feeling pretty fancy after dropping more than $10 on a piece of wood, we got kicked out went home to get started.

First, we cut our board to about 16 inches long using our miter saw. The length (and width) are really up to you, but we thought the 8”x16” size looked good.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com We also decided to cut off one corner to add some visual interest, but again, totally optional. We just liked the look of it.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com Then we marked where our hole would be drilled. The hole can be used for hanging the cutting board, and it also adds even more visual interest. We marked the center of our corner cut, and made a mark about 1 inch inward from the center (we used a combination square). That mark became the center of our hole.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com We used a drill press with a 1-⅛” hole saw to cut the hole. Make sure to not drill all the way through from one side of our board. This could damage the grains on the other side. Instead, just as the tip of the drill exits the wood, stop drilling, flip the board, and continue drilling from the other side, using the tiny hole you made with the tip of the drill as your guide.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com Woooo, that’s all the cuts you need to make! Pretty simple right?

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com Now it’s time to make it smooth and pretty. First, sand top side, bottom side, and outer edges with a random orbit sander using 220 grit sandpaper. I spent some time on the edges of the 45 degree cut to round the sharp edge. Don’t worry about the 90 degree corners, we’ll handle those later.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com Then use a router with a ⅛” radius roundover bit to take the corners from a sharp edge to a round edge. This bit is a game changer! I never thought about how much of a difference having that rounded edge made.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com I also rounded over the 90 degree corners with this. It makes the finished product look extra nice because all the corners will have the exact same radius.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com Next, we hand sanded our newly rounded corners and the inside of our hole with some 220-320 grit sandpaper. We found that sanding a higher quality hardwood is much easier and quicker than something like pine, that gets more splintered when you cut it.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com Final step – oil your wood! Make sure to get the outside edges and inside the hanging hole too. We are in love with Natchez Solution wood oil, it’s the same stuff we’ve been using on the butcher block dining table we DIY’d a few months ago. It’s got mineral oil, lemon oil, and beeswax.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com After waiting 24 hours, your cutting board is ready to be used! Cutting on it for the first time was a little nerve-racking, I’ll admit. It was so pretty and perfect I didn’t want to mess it up. But I’m happy to report that it works and washes up well! A few light knife marks and no staining so far.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com Hope you guys like this tutorial! If you want one of these cutting boards but not sure if you want to tackle the project yourself, we actually sell them too! You can find them in a few different wood options on our Etsy shop.

DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Solid Wood Cutting Board - evanandkatelyn.com

………………………………………………………………

You can also find us at:

YouTube…………….. https://www.youtube.com/evanandkatelyn
Instagram………….. http://instagram.com/evanandkatelyn @evanandkatelyn
Instructables………. https://www.instructables.com/member/evanandkatelyn/
Facebook………..….. https://www.facebook.com/evanandkatelyn/

………………………………………………………………

Note: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting us!

2

Garage storage ideas

In our last garage post (and video) we covered part 1 of our garage series: how we patched, repaired, and painted our very sad looking walls.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com In today’s post, we’re covering how we turned that clean slate into something actually functional too. The goal: to be able to use this space as a workshop AND still be able to pull both of our cars in. We took it from this:

DIY garage storage solutions and organization - evanandkatelyn.com To this! Holy crap!!

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com You can watch the video that covers everything below, or keep scrolling for all our choices, steps, and tips in blog-format.

[Before we keep going, I want to pause and say if you have a second it would mean SO much to us if you’d like our video or subscribe to our channel. Since we’re brand new to YouTube, every view, like, and subscription makes a huge difference for us. Click here to see the whole channel. Thank youuuuu! We’re doing a big goofy happy dance right now!]

And now, all the details and unattractive photos you’ve been waiting for. As you saw in the video, this is where we started…
So the challenge is that we were asking a lot from our little garage. We’re asking it to house two cars, have all the functionality we need for our DIY projects, and act as a workshop for making products. Oh yeah, and be organized and look nice while you’re at it.

When we bought the house, we actually did inherit a decent amount of storage. It was just… not how we would have done it.

There were some pegboards, but they had been cut up and placed around three different spots that didn’t all make sense. For instance, the right side of our garage has a step that gives us a few feet of space between our cars and the wall, so it would be perfect for something that required more space, like shelving. But a big pegboard, which sits more flush against the wall, was taking up half of that wall. And since we had extra space in front of it (and no room anywhere else), stuff always ended up getting piled there. Plus, these pegboards weren’t in the best of shape. They had lots of gouges, unusable holes, and so on.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We inherited some ok shelves too, but the shelves were on brackets that were screwed into drywall (instead of studs) so we couldn’t put too much weight on them. Also, the ones on the left side of our garage made it hard for Evan, who parks on the left, to get out of his car without hitting something, so placement wasn’t always great.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com The garage also came sporting some old cabinets and a wire rack, which we planned on sprucing up and continuing to use.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com In addition to these bits and pieces of storage, we’ve added our own over the years. We have a big Uline shelving unit for heavy and big things (if you squint your eyes you can see it behind the wood, cords, and bike).

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We bought a small tool storage/work table when we first moved in that we very quickly outgrew.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com So then recently we built a giant rolling work table that better suited our needs, but took up a lot of space.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com And we built a rolling wood cart to hold extra scrap wood (see it to the right of the work table?).

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com So I guess what I’m trying to say is… we have a lot of tools and project materials and general garage-y stuff, so we have a lot of storage to try and corral that stuff, but then the storage units themselves just end up being more stuff to take up space. We knew something had to change.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com STEP 1: Declutter garage (and fix the walls while we’re at it)

We got rid of as many things as possible. This included a bunch of stuff we never used, plus the storage we decided to ditch. We Craigslisted the black tool table and ripped off the old shelving and pegboards.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Then, as y’all know from our last post/video [LINK], we pulled everything away from the walls so we could patch, repair, and paint them, giving ourselves a clean slate to move forward.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com STEP 2: New pegboards

Pegboards are pretty much a garage staple in our minds. Even though we got rid of our old ones, new ones were first on our list of things to buy. You might view pegboards as sort of a basic item without much variance between one and another, which honestly is kinda how I felt before this project, but then we found these:

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Wall Control pegboards. They’re made of steel, they come in modular panels, they have built-in stand off, they’re incredibly sturdy, and they are just about as pretty as pegboards can be. (Side note, no, they are not sponsors, we just LOVE these things).

Here’s what you’ll need to install them:

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We decided to put these on the left side of our garage, because we needed this wall to have storage that was more flush (so Evan could still get out of his car).

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com These pegboards are made to work with the normal spacing of normal studs in a normal house. What we found in our garage is that the studs were a little off in some places, and really off in others, so they didn’t count as “normal”. To get around this, we used 1×4’s to bridge between our studs.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com First, use a stud finder to find your studs.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com *wink!

And mark them on the wall.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We had eight feet worth of panels so we got three eight-foot 1×4’s, and placed them horizontally at three different heights because the panels have attachment points at their top, middle, and bottom.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Use a level so your 1×4’s aren’t all kittywampus, and grab a buddy if you can because it helps to have one person holding one end while the other person screws into the other. Screw the pegboards into the boards at their top, middle, and bottom attachment points.

Because the pegboards have built in stand off, screwing them into the boards doesn’t make you lose any usable space like with a traditional pegboard.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Because we bridged the studs, we could attach our pegboards to the 1×4’s without having to worry about hitting a stud.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Each pegboard panel has six attachment points (three on each side) that you’ll need to screw into your 1×4’s.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Then it was just a matter of putting up our tools. There’s something about a fresh pegboard that makes you feel organized and on top of life. DIY garage storage and organization - evanandkatelyn.com

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com STEP 3: New shelving

Shelves were another item that we still wanted, we just had requirements that the old ones didn’t mean. Mainly, we wanted them to be easily adjustable, and able to hold more weight than our old ones.

We ended up finding this rail and bracket system called EverBilt. It’s kinda like what you might find in a closet system: different lengths of rails and brackets that hook into them. Then you just use wood planks as the shelves themselves.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We love the idea of this because we want to be able to move shelves around easily if we need a different set up in the future.

To install these, you’ll need:

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We planned to put all our shelving on the right side of the garage, where we have the stepped up area (because we have a little more space between the wall and the car on that side).

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Again, the first step to this project is finding and marking your studs. And again, our studs were really wonky. Like… they seemingly disappeared anywhere above five feet in some areas.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Meaning we had to go with a different part of the wall on this side of the garage, but it was fine and honestly probably worked out even better in the end because it’s closer to where our worktable ended up.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Mark your studs at several different heights and draw a vertical line connecting your marks. You’ll attach the rails vertically along the studs, and you want to make sure you hit the stud with every screw.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Screw a rail into each stud. You’ll need at least two rails obviously, but if you need more weight support or if you’re spanning a wider area, you can do more.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Then all you need to do is add a bracket onto the rails at each height you want a shelf. They just pop right in, super easy.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We used 12 inch deep boards for our shelves, in lengths of 6 feet since that was the widest we could go on this wall. The weight of the boards makes them stay in place pretty solidly on the brackets.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com The best thing is if we need to adjust the height of a shelf, it’s so easy to bump the brackets up or down and place the board back on top.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We used these shelves for things like drawers of safety gear, boxes of extra product and supplies for our pop up shops, and our OCD-embracing screw, nail, and general hardware organizers.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We ended up living these so much, we added a couple shelves above our pegboards too using some of the short rail lengths (they come in several lengths). We use these for extra wood that’s too long for our rolly cart and items we don’t need frequent access to.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com STEP 3: Track system

Next we added a track system to hold the typical long awkward items you have in a garage, like shovels, rakes, etc. We decided this would go on the left wall next to the pegboards (because these tend to be more flush against the wall too). There are a lot of systems to choose from, but we went with the Rubbermaid FastTrack system. Mainly because it’s got a big variety of hooks, was very modular, and had great reviews.

To install this, you’ll need

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com First, you guessed it, find and mark your studs. We used the 1×4 trick again to bridge between them.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Then attach the track onto your 1×4. The secondary benefit of using the 1×4 is that it gives a little bit of extra space between the items you’re hanging from the track and your wall, meaning your wall won’t get as dirty or beat up.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com The cover should slide right over your track.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Then clip on your hooks. There are all sorts of different types, depending on what you need to hang.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We filled it up pretty fast with brooms, shovels, rakes, trimmers, etc. It can even hold super heavy stuff like our ladder.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We love how modular and sturdy this is!

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com STEP 4: Wire rack

After installing our new storage, we turned our eye back to our existing storage. This little wire rack has rested humbly in our corner for years and we actually use it, so it was a keeper. But he was dirty, chipped, and slightly off white. So we gave him a good scrubbing and a coat of white semigloss spray paint.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Then we added him on the wall back where he used to be, except this time we screwed him into studs (seriously, it seems like NOTHING in this garage had been attached to studs).

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com STEP 5: Cabinets

Our cabinets, which came with the house, originally started out pretty much the ugliest brown you could ever imagine. So one day we couldn’t take it any more and we painted them with some white paint we just happened to have on hand. What we didn’t think about was that it was flat paint, so it got really dirty really easily. We had some of our paint leftover from painting the walls, which was Behr Ultra Premium Plus off-the-shelf white in a satin sheen, so we decided to try that.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Hopefully painting them with extra paint won’t come back to bite us in the butt again, but they definitely look better now and are easier to clean!

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We also gave the knobs a new coat of paint. They had been painted over so many times that it had built up quite a bit.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com To get off the old paint and prep them for a new coat, we used this trick. First, screw a knob onto your drill.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Then use one hand to control the drill, and the other hand to hold emery cloth around the knob. As the drill spins, the cloth sands the paint off the knob.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com It’s a little hard to tell in the photo because the old knob color was white and the paint that had gotten on it was white, but it was much smoother!

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We spray painted them semigloss white to even them out (I know, seems kinda redundant, but it helped give them a more finished look)

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Then we reattached the knobs and called these cabinets done.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com STEP 6: Moving stuff into place, DIY dolly shelf, DIY drying racks

The step was kinda like “ok we are basically done, let’s move stuff back, wait let’s DIY a couple things while we’re at it!” So not so much a step we did, more like a series of fortunate distractions as we wrapped this thing up.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We moved our Uline back where it used to live to the left of the cabinets and loaded up our big, heavy items.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We used to keep extra tile and bricks from the house stacked underneath it, but it was like a breeding ground for cobwebs, dirt, and dead bugs back there because they were so heavy, we could never move them to clean. So we decided to convert an old dolly to a low profile rolling tile storage cart (really, this would work for anything low profile and heavy).

To install this, you’ll need

  • 1/2″ plywood
  • Some extra scrap wood to bring the lower center part level with the ends
  • Screws

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com The dolly has a higher, padded part on either end, and slightly lower wooden parts across the middle. So Evan cut some 1×4’s down to size so that they could sit on top of the wooden parts and make the middle of the dolly level with the ends of the dolly.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Then we used some 3/4” thick plywood that was just a little wider and longer than the dolly and secured it on top with four screws. We drilled through the plywood, through the 1×4’s, into the wooden part of the dolly’s frame.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We loaded her up with tile and she fit snuggly under our Uline. Now it’s about a billion times easier to move the tile around when we need to. That stuff is HEAVY.

Side note, I looked into it and a dolly like this is only $19. In a lot of cases, that’s cheaper than buying wood + four casters, and it’s already put together for you. So if you’re needing a quick and simple rolling cart, might be worth just getting a dolly and popping some plywood on top!

Next we added our rolling wood cart to the right of the cabinets. We had hoped to put it there, and last minute realized it was about 6 inches too wide (that’s what we get for dreaming big and not measuring). We didn’t get photos of this step, but we cut off some overhanging surface, moved a couple casters, and baaaaarely got it to fit. Woo!

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com The space under the cabinets was begging for our work table, but before rolling it in we took a few to add a little more functionality to it. We use this table for all sorts of projects, including working on our products, which often require time to dry (wet paint, cement that needs to cure, stain that’s soaking in, etc). We used to use the oh so glamorous technique of dismantling cardboard boxes, laying them flat on the floor, and splaying all our drying goodies across those. Which technically worked, but was not space efficient at all.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We were liking our shelves from earlier so much, we got more short rails and more brackets to built a drying rack area under our worktable. We attached the rails to the table legs, popped in the brackets, and used planks of particle board (?????) as shelving. I can’t believe we never thought of this before – it is SUCH a better use of space! No more tip toeing around drying products all over the floors!

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Once our drying rack was loaded up, we rolled the work table under the cabinets and it was literally a perfect fit. I’m kind of in disbelief that this worked. Our Tetris skills of yore were clearly put to good use.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Moment of Truth

All of our stuff corralled? Check. Usable work space for projects and products? Check. Space to pull in both of our cars?

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Check!!!!!!

Y’all. This is for real. And I kinda can’t believe it. Especially when you look back on where this started.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com We kinda feel like now that our garage is in order, there’s no stopping us. Feel like making a DIY cutting board or a bench? No biggie, our wood is no longer buried under a mountain of disgrace. Need to crank out a new product order? No longer do we have to turn our garage floor into a sea of half-dried items.

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com Expect a (hopefully) higher frequency of projects, new products, and posts now that this space is functional again!

DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com DIY garage storage solutions - evanandkatelyn.com

………………………………………………………………

You can also find us at:

YouTube…………….. https://www.youtube.com/evanandkatelyn
Instagram………….. http://instagram.com/evanandkatelyn @evanandkatelyn
Instructables………. https://www.instructables.com/member/evanandkatelyn/
Facebook………..….. https://www.facebook.com/evanandkatelyn/

………………………………………………………………

Note: This post contains affiliate links. Thank you for supporting us!

0