Archive | Home Decor

Doing a mix-matched gallery wall

We have a lotttt of art. Evan and I both paint/draw, we have artists in the family so we collect art from them, and I have a tendency to save things that I think might make good art someday (a pretty page from a magazine or calendar for example). So yeah, we are overflowing.

Therefore, we’re no strangers to gallery walls. In fact, we have a 23 foot gallery that takes up an entire wall in our living room! But we’ve always played it safe in one regard – when we do frames our frames match, and when we do canvases we do alllll canvases. The living room wall has been 100% wrapped canvases until very recently. Here is a pic of how it looked when we first put it up, and it stayed that way for a couple years.

Doing a mix-matched gallery wall - evanandkatelyn.com

A few months ago we decided to start mixing things up and we added some black framed art to our canvas-dominated wall.

The other gallery walls in our house were all black frames – and not even different black frames, all the EXACT same black frame in different sizes. In our dining room I just recently added, prepare yourself, art with slightly different black frames. (those three with the mats…. yes, so different)

Doing a mix-matched gallery wall - evanandkatelyn.com

So after dipping my toes into the mix-and-match-frame pool, I decided it was time to actually jump in. The plan was to fill another wall and not be so matchy matchy about the frames, type of art, etc. The wall we chose for the job: our empty hallway.

You may have guessed that already if you remember seeing a few frames peeking out in our post about painting your yellowy fixtures white. That was somewhere in the middle of operation mix-match, but it’s evolved quite a bit since then. I’m going to show you how it turned out, and walk you through our method.

Doing a mix-matched gallery wall - evanandkatelyn.com

So there are two ways you can go about starting a gallery wall:

  1. You can look at the art/photos you already have and then go buy frames for whatever needs frames. Or,
  2. You go buy frames you think will make a nice arrangement, then buy/make/print things to go into said frames.

Because we wanted to get some photos printed and we had enough extra art laying around that we could fill various frame sizes, we went with option 2. If you have one or more specific pieces, option 1 might be a better bet for you.

We’ve tried a lot of different methods when it comes to putting up gallery walls, but in our experience the fastest/simplest route is to lay everything out on the floor in front of the wall, eyeball where the middle piece should go, and work your way out from the middle. Some people will recommend getting butcher paper, cutting out pieces that match your frame size, and arranging those on the wall with tape first, but I think that takes wayyyyy too long. I figure with our method, worst case scenario is that we have to move our art around and fill a few nail holes (or just cover the holes with more art, am-I-right?).

We already had extra black frames, and I wanted to incorporate some white frames, so I decided to get a mix of black and white, some thick, some thin, some with mats, and some without. I laid these out, along with some existing canvases.  The lower left and upper right canvases were just spare ones that I planned to paint over.

So here it is up on the wall. Meh. Something just felt kinda off and not cohesive (and I promise I was trying as hard as I could to use my imagination and see past the frame “filler images” and the smoke alarm with no face).

So I rearranged it to the version you saw from the vent posts. I painted the fern art, the cross-hatch piece in the middle of the bottom row, and the mountain piece in that’s cut off on the bottom left.

Doing a mix-matched gallery wall - evanandkatelyn.com

This was definitely better and we kept it like this for a long time. Then I saw the gold Target frames. I immediately bought three in all different sizes and knew I had to make them work somehow. But with our mix of unframed pieces (canvas), white framed pieces, and black framed pieces, I wasn’t crazy enough to add another variable. So I moved a few of these guys to the living room gallery, and painted any black frames that remained with a semi-gloss white spray paint.

After much rearranging, and finally getting off my butt to get some wedding and vacation photos printed, I landed on this layout and I love it!

Doing a mix-matched gallery wall - evanandkatelyn.com

Doing a mix-matched gallery wall - evanandkatelyn.com

Being in a long skinny hallway, it’s not the easiest to take pictures of, but hopefully this gives you an idea of how it turned out.

Doing a mix-matched gallery wall - evanandkatelyn.com

It was definitely worth the wait because we love the balance of art and photos, the various sizes and how they all play together, and the color scheme that ended up kinda materializing on it’s own (blues, greens, and golds).

Hope this shows that it’s ok for your walls to be continually evolving. It’s worth a few extra nail holes to just start somewhere, even if you don’t quite know where you’re going yet. After seeing how this hallway turned out, now I’m wanting to make even more changes in our living room and dining room – so expect more art wall updates to come!

2

DIY wood canvas frame

Hey guys! Quick project on the blog today. We’re going to be walking you through how to make a simple, simple frame for any art you have laying around. We did it for a wrapped canvas, but we’re pretty sure you can use the same method for anything else you might frame (a poster, a print, etc). Here’s the finished product:

DIY wood canvas frame - evanandkatelyn.com

Custom frames can easily cost a couple hundred bucks (which is like, dozens of chickfila spicy chicken sandwiches). Our frame only cost us a few dollars. Meaning I have a lot of spicy chicken in my future.

DIY wood canvas frame - evanandkatelyn.com

Here’s what you’ll need:

Tools used:

So here’s how we did it. We started by measuring the outside edges of our canvas. We wanted the corners of the frame to meet at 45 degree angles, like in the graphic below. When you are measuring, make sure that the inside of your frame pieces is what matches up with the canvas measurement, and draw a 45 degree line out from that. The outside of your frame pieces will therefore be a little longer than the inside.

Alternatively, you could forego a 45 degree cut and just have them meet perpendicularly.

DIY wood canvas frame - evanandkatelyn.com

After marking on our trim wood pieces where the cuts needed to go, Evan quickly sliced the wood on the miter saw but you could use a simple jigsaw instead if you have a steady hand.

DIY wood canvas frame - evanandkatelyn.com

Once all four pieces were cut, we put wood glue at each corner where the pieces met. We used right angle clamps to hold the pieces together. You don’t have to buy four: if you have patience, you can just get one and do one corner at a time. Make sure to wipe off any excess glue that squeezes our, then let them dry overnight.

DIY wood canvas frame - evanandkatelyn.com

DIY wood canvas frame - evanandkatelyn.com

When we took the clamps off everything was nice and sturdy. Then we used an old rag to wipe on some Minwax stain in Dark Walnut (our favorite!) and let that dry for the recommended drying time.

The easiest thing about this frame? It just pops right onto the canvas. Simple tension holds the canvas in place, so there is no glass or hardware needed.

img_8335

If making the same frame for a print or poster, you can simply tape the print/poster to the back of the frame or staple it in if you want something a little sturdier.

Hope this helps you out with some of that art you’ve been meaning to frame!

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0

DIY Faux Fur Tree Skirt (and Garland!)

In yesterday’s Christmas decor post I mentioned we added some faux fur in both tree skirt and garland form. As promised, today I’m sharing this quick DIY you can do in an afternoon (ie you can finish it before the Christmas!) Bonus: this tree skirt only cost about $15 as opposed to the $69 versions elsewhere and you get a free garland out of the material too.

First my mom (thanks mom!) picked up some faux fur fabric from Jo-Ann’s. I opted for a tawny light brown color, but a warm white would look great too. The size you need will depend on your tree, but for our 7.5ft tree we went with a 60″ x 60″ square (human below for reference).

Then we flipped it over and marked the center.

After we had our center point, we could trace out our circle. There are several ways to do this: eyeball it, trace something big like a hula hoop, etc. My husband is an engineer so of course it involved magnets, a ruler, and pure precision.

So we put magnets on top of the center point and one under the fabric to hold them in place. Then we placed one end of our yardstick, which had a hole in it, over the magnets and used it as a compass. You could do the same thing by tying a string to the magnets in the center and using that as your compass.

By placing a marker at the end of your ruler (or your string) and rotating it around the center point, you’ll create a perfect circle.

Tada!

I’d recommend taking it outside to cut it because you are gonna get fur everywhere. I may look like I’m simply draped in a luxurious fur hanging out in my garage, but really I’m trying to cut it and not let it touch the ground at the same time. Evan only laughed at me for a minute before snapping a picture and helping me hold it :P

We cut along the circle and we also cut one line from the edge of the circle to the center point (so you can slide the center to the base of the tree).

Side note: our garage is insane. Lotsssss of different projects in progress. We’ll clean it… one day.

After cutting the circle out, shake it like a crazy person in your driveway or wherever you think you’ll gather the most attention from curious neighbors.

Bonus points if you get airborne while shaking it out.

We wrapped it around the base of the tree, putting the cut to the center in the back. Some of our edges were a little rough but we kinda feel like it gives it a more realistic look.

Of course… once we added presents you can barely see it.

But I know it’s there and I love it and that’s what matters!!!! Plus, as the presents disappear, the tree won’t look so sad and barren.

Part two of this tutorial is what we did with the scraps! We had a big ring of fur left, so I trimmed off the corners which left a circle of fabric. I took that and wrapped it around the baby tree in our office. It’s a nice tie in to our big tree, and it’s a super easy way to add visual impact to a without needing to hang ornaments.

Well there you have it! This was an easy and fun project that took very little time to complete – aka the perfect thing to tackle when you’re already counting down the days til Christmas!

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0

Living room fan swap

Hey guys! So I’m continually realizing that there are projects we’ve completed that never got shared on the blog. Until some recent changes at Evan’s job, he would frequently have to work 11-12 hour days, and therefore I’d take on all the home/life-related responsibilities when I’d get home from work, so basically we had like zero time. We were honestly lucky to get any projects done, we just didn’t have time to blog about everything. So I’m here to gradually get you guys up to speed with the changes we’ve made.

First off is something we thought would be minor but ended up being a big upgrade in our eyes: swapping out our old living room fan.

Living Room Fan Swap - evanandkatelyn.com

We’ve done a few fan swaps in our time, like the one in our office and the extra-difficult one in our bedroom, so we’re no strangers to the process.

It’s always good to start by turning off the power, you know, so you don’t get electrocuted. Then we laid down a drop cloth to catch any ceiling dust or screws that fell onto the couch. Caught a cat instead.

Living Room Fan Swap - evanandkatelyn.com

Next we unscrewed the glass globes and lightbulbs since they’re the most breakable. Then we started removing the fan blades (you just unscrew them).

Living Room Fan Swap - evanandkatelyn.com

After the blades were off, we went to work on the drop rod and base of the fan. There aren’t tons of pictures of this because we needed two pairs of hands (that’s where the motor is, so it’s heavy!).

Living Room Fan Swap - evanandkatelyn.com

We disconnected the wires and reconnected them to the base of the new fan (you can see a great step by step of this here).

Then it was time to put the new fan together. First off, this is the one we got. We did a lot of research about what size fan we needed in order to get air circulation and light in such a big room, and this one fit the bill and our style. We’ve had it for over two years now and we still love it! I guess you could say we’re big fans…

To install it, we first added the drop rod and base of the new fan. The bulbs and glass light coverings were part of the main body of the fan so they were up at this point as well.

Living Room Fan Swap - evanandkatelyn.com

Then we screwed the blades into place. It’s a pretty simple process.

Living Room Fan Swap - evanandkatelyn.com

Last but not least, we swapped out our ugly 70’s dimmer, which we couldn’t even use because the old fan bulbs buzzed but were too high for us to bother swapping them out. We replaced it with a crisp white switch.

Living Room Fan Swap - evanandkatelyn.com

Here’s the new fan!

Living Room Fan Swap - evanandkatelyn.com

So remember earlier when I said this swap ended up making a bigger difference than expected? It’s because our new fan has down lights AND up lights – and that is amazing! See, 90% of the time we only have the uplight on. Unlike our old fan (and most fans) that only shine down and cause harsh shadows on everything, the up light shins up on the ceiling and the light is diffused indirectly throughout the room.

And if we need bonus light (like when I’m making ornaments at the coffee table watching Gilmore Girls), we can turn on the down light and gain some bonus brightness.

Living Room Fan Swap - evanandkatelyn.com

Updating fans and light fixtures may seem like minor projects, but that kind of stuff has a huge bang-for-your-buck (and effort) effect on making your home feel fresh and updated. What do you guys like to do to your house that feels like a nice update, but really isn’t that hard?

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0

DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable

Hey guys! Today I’m super excited to share a quick and easy DIY that you can do after work this evening (and still have time to make pasta for dinner… mmmm pasta). It’s a cute tabletop menu that’s perfect for Thanksgiving, or really any get together where food is involved (aka, the best type of get togethers). It could also be used as an easily changeable display for art, photos, even a mini calendar printout for your desk! Here it is:

DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable - evanandkatelyn.com

As you know from our post about how we prepped for our pop up shop, we made various pieces of signage for the event. I’m a big fan of creating multiple uses from our DIY projects, so rather than letting it collect dust in between pop ups, I put this piece to work. The piece I’m talking about is our little pricing sign.

In the photo below, it’s the shorter wood sign (with E&K at the top). It’s a simple piece made of wood, glue, and a few magnets. AKA it’s super easy y’all.

dscf1956

It’s a nice size – big enough to stand out, but not so big that it will overpower the rest of your tablescape. I created a menu design and swapped out the price sheet for the menu sheet, and it looks right at home on our little sign.

DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable - evanandkatelyn.com

First off, you can download the free printable menu by clicking here. It’s already sized for this stand so it’s easy peasy. And no, the download does not include my amazing sample menu already on it… although a meal involving tacos, donuts, and bacon sounds like my idea of a good time.

So let’s get onto the DIY shall we! Here’s what you’ll need:

  • About 11 inches of 1×6 wood
    (you’ll cut this into 2 pieces, it doesn’t need to be exact)
  • Super glue or wood glue
    (we looooove the super glue we linked to because it comes with an accelerant: you put the glue on side A, spray accelerant on side B, pop em together, and it sets pretty much instantly – aka no clamping required)
  • 8 cylindrical 1/4″ Neodymium magnets
    (if you already have other magnets they might work, but we like these 1/4″ ones because it’s easy to drill an exactly 1/4″ hole)

Tools used:

  • Miter saw
    (but you could get the pieces cut at Hone Depot or Lowes, or use a jig saw or hand saw if you did it carefully)
  • Power drill
  • 1/4″ drill bit used to get the circles for the embedded magnets
    (Evan recommends getting a 29 piece set like this one instead of buying individual bits)

So we took our piece of 1×6 wood and cut it into two pieces: a 3″ long piece for the horizontal base, and a 8″ long piece for the vertical display. Your pieces don’t have to be exactly the same lengths as ours; the final product just has to not topple over (which might happen if you made the vertical piece too tall or the horizontal base too skinny).

DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable - evanandkatelyn.com

Before we attached the two pieces of wood, we created recessed holes for the magnets. The magnets are what hold your printed menu onto the stand. We bought these 1/4″ magnets and Evan used his 1/4″ bit to make holes the exact size of the magnets.

In order to not drill too deep, we use a white paint pen to mark on the drill bit itself what depth we want to go to. You can place your magnet next to your bit and make a mark on the bit that’s the same height as your magnet. Another alternative is using a drill stop, which is a little bit more fool proof. You don’t want to drill too far; it’s better to have to go back and drill a little more.

Before gluing, do a test fit by dropping the magnets in your holes. They should fit perfectly flush with the wood (so satisfying!). If they fit, put a drop of super glue in each hole and popped in the magnets. If they don’t fit, drill a little more out.

DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable - evanandkatelyn.com

DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable - evanandkatelyn.com

Then we placed our menu so that the corners were over the four magnets, and we took the other four magnets and popped them into place over the menu. Technically it’s probably better to add your print out later, but we are impatient. Plus, magnets are fun :)

DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable - evanandkatelyn.com

Next up is gluing your two boards together. You can place the vertical piece on the horizontal piece (without glue) to get it centered, and then lightly mark on either side of the vertical piece so you know where to glue it. Next, apply super glue or wood glue to the bottom of the vertical piece and place back on the horizontal piece using your guide lines.

DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable - evanandkatelyn.com

We did super glue (+ the accelerant) so after holding it on for a few seconds, the glue was set. If you use wood glue, you’ll need to clamp it and leave it drying for the time specified on your bottle of wood glue.

DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable - evanandkatelyn.com DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable - evanandkatelyn.com

And there you have it! I love that this DIY isn’t holiday specific – really it could be used to display any menu, photo, art, mini calendar… so many things you could do with it!

DIY Tabletop Menu + Thanksgiving Printable - evanandkatelyn.com

Free calendar printable graphic from LollyJane blog.

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0

2016 Halloween Decor

I love Halloween you guys. If it was socially acceptable to Trick-Or-Treat at the age of 29, I would. But it’s not, so I make up for it with for it with creepy movies, our annual Scare for a Cure adventure, dressing up, and decking our house out with pumpkins, ghosts, and skulls :)

To get a bigger decor bang for our buck, we like to do all the decorating in the main areas of our house instead of thinning it out over the entire square footage. Side note, you’re not going to find any Martha-Stewart-level stuff going on here. More like Target-post-Halloween-sale level stuff with a healthy dose of DIY, but we make it work y’all emoji-deal-with-it  So why don’t we jump right in!

Our 2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

Our dining table got a handful of pumpkins that we painted and fixed up (tutorials here and here) to go along with our usual IKEA planters. I also used some of the felt from our old pumpkin placemats and cut out little bats to sprinkle around. I like that after Halloween, I can remove the bats but keep everything else the same for fall (until Christmas takes over!) The warm tones of our new butcher block table top give everything a cozy vibe.

2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

We also added a little hint of Halloween to our built ins with my Z-Gallerie bling skull. My mom got him for me back when I was in my first apartment and he’s one of the coolest dudes I know (aside from my husband, who is definitely THE coolest).

2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

In the living room, our L.O.V.E. letters are now home to a felt pumpkin like you saw last week. He’s still standing up on his own in the O, which makes me pretty happy :)

2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

Our coffee table got a little dose of fall with this target pumpkin and my favorite World Market raven. Also, Evan made the small copper wire ball out of some wire we got at Michael’s.

2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

You might see a little Jack and Sally peeking out from our media center on the left side of the photo above. These two are actually on our shelf all the time, so they’re not technically Halloween decor, but they sure fit in this time of year #grownupscanhavetoystoo.

2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

My Tim Burton art book is also always on display, but the addition of another pumpkin makes it that much more Halloween-y :)

2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

The fireplace got our spray painted hurricanes, my favorite little ghost candle holder from, you guessed it, Target, and our West Elm constellation hurricanes/candleholders (they look like they’re dotted with stars!). These all work well with our DIY’d silver branch, which we still love.

Side note: the whole deal is made even better by these awesome LED candles we have with built in timers…they come on every evening and stay on for 5-6 hours. Not gonna lie, I feel pretty freakin fancy coming home to a house with lit candles everywhere.

2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

Our carved Jack Skellington and Domo funkins live near our faux ficus. (they’re sporting more of our LED candles too but they weren’t lit for the photo). You can read here how we painted Jack to look more realistic and gave Domo a metallic ombre look.

2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

Our entry is home to the DIY felt pumpkin garland I threw together along with a few other Halloween faves. I love Jack and Sally, obvs, so they have a spot here as well, along with a couple black glittery Target pumpkins.

2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

2016 Halloween Decor - evanandkatelyn.com

Well this about sums up our Halloween decor this year! Now to go scope out everyone else’s… :D

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0

Feeling Batty – DIY Felt Bats

Hey guys! The quickest of quick Halloween post today. Here’s the story: Girl meets felt placemats. Girl cuts out pumpkins from placemats and turns them into a garland. Girl is getting ready to throw out the remaining felt scraps when a lightbulb goes off/her cheapness takes over and she thinks “I can make something out of this felt!” And hence, 36 tiny bats were born.

Feeling Batty - DIY Felt Bats - evanandkatelyn.com

Before I started cutting, I made myself a bat template. If you want you can grab my cutesy simple bat below (just right click and save the image to your desktop, then print at whatever size you want) or you can google “bat outline” and find just about any type of bat you can imagine.

Feeling Batty - DIY Felt Bats - evanandkatelyn.com

I cut out my template and used it as a guide for cutting the felt. Because I was doing teeny tiny bats, it was easiest to use a little binder clip to hold the template in place while I cut (when my cut made it around to the clip, I’d just move the clip).

Feeling Batty - DIY Felt Bats - evanandkatelyn.com

On a side note, I started this project with the Fiskars I’ve had in my drawer for a few years. Ended up with carpal tunnel (not really, but oh the hand cramps!). Then Evan busted out his favorite pair of scissors (yes, we’re the types of people that have favorite pairs of scissors) and they were soooooooo much better. I’m converted. Bonus: they are only $8.73 on Amazon.

I cut and cut, and cut some more. Not a bad way to spend some time when you’ve got Netflix on in the background and a fall candle burning within sniff-range.

Feeling Batty - DIY Felt Bats - evanandkatelyn.com

My original intent was to turn these into a garland, but then seeing them strewn about the table I thought they actually looked pretty good as table top decor. I’ll do another post in a few days with lots more photos of where these and all of our other Halloween crafties live around the house. For now, here’s a round up of all the Halloween projects we’ve done so far:

Sprucing up faux pumpkins with puffy paint, a bit more realism, and metallic ombre.
Upgrading our Halloween hurricanes with metallic insides.
Turning felt pumpkin placements into a felt pumpkin garland.
Fixing some messed up gourds with Sugru and paint.
Bonus 1: our DIY floating outdoor ghosts from a few years ago.
Bonus 2: our Halloween decor from a few years ago.

Bonus 3: this silly video

6

Upgrading Faux Gourds with Paint and Sugru

I’m back with more easy Halloween decor upgrades today! I’ve already posted about how we DIY’d pumpkins three different ways; with puffy paint, realistic paint, and metallic ombre. We also upgraded our black jack-o-lantern hurricanes by painting the insides copper. Then we turned felt pumpkin placements into a felt pumpkin garland.

Next my eyes turned to a couple heavily discounted gourds we got at Michaels that were just too cheap to pass up. This one is a texture-y ceramic pumpkin that was marked down from $20 to $4 because of a sale coupled with a damage discount.

Upgrading Faux Gourds with Paint and Sugru evanandkatelyn.com

It’s nothing a little Sugru couldn’t fix! If you’re not familiar with Sugru, it’s a moldable glue. Think clay meets glue, kinda like sticky tack but with a much better hold (and it doesn’t leave oily smudges all over your dorm room walls). In the photo above, we’ve already filled the hole with it, using some scrap wood to poke at it ’til the texture matched the rest of the pumpkin.

Upgrading Faux Gourds with Paint and Sugru evanandkatelyn.com

After letting it harden for 24 hours, I came back and blotted it with gold and copper acrylic paint. Good as new!

Upgrading Faux Gourds with Paint and Sugru evanandkatelyn.com

We also got this metallic gold and pearly white squash on sale for $2.50 (can you tell I’m digging the metallics this year?). It was meant to be in a bowl I guess because every one of them had this nub on the bottom that wouldn’t let it sit upright. Sugru to the rescue again! We molded it around the nub and created a little base that allowed the squash to sit upright.

Upgrading Faux Gourds with Paint and Sugru evanandkatelyn.com

After it hardened for 24 hours, I used acrylics to paint it cream with gold spots so it would look like part of the squash itself.

Upgrading Faux Gourds with Paint and Sugru evanandkatelyn.com

Upgrading Faux Gourds with Paint and Sugru evanandkatelyn.com

And now he can stand upright instead of toppling over. Plus the part I painted blends right in and looks like it’s part of the squash itself (unless you get super close)

Upgrading Faux Gourds with Paint and Sugru evanandkatelyn.com

Everything we used for these little makeovers we already had on hand (yay for free makeovers!). But even if you need to buy some of the materials, they are cheap and will last for many future projects. Hope these inspire you to take a second look on that tired decor you’re not loving anymore (I rhymed!).

Note: This post contains affiliated links. Thank you for supporting our blog!

4

From Felt Placemats to DIY Pumpkin Garland

Hey guys! You may have seen Wednesday’s DIY decor post where I upgraded our black jack-o-lantern hurricanes with copper paint or last week’s DIY painted pumpkins. I’m here to continue the series of easy Halloween decor DIY’s with a story of placemats-turned-garland.

I had these four felt pumpkin placemats that I snagged from Target a few years ago. But they totally weren’t practical for two reasons: 1) who can use a felt placemat without messing it up?? 2) we have six table settings at our table and only four pumpkin placemats. That would just look silly.

Turning Felt Placemats into a DIY Pumpkin Garland evanandkatelyn.com

So I decided to cut out the pumpkins and use them as a garland! The first cut was a little scary, but after that it went quickly.

Turning Felt Placemats into a DIY Pumpkin Garland evanandkatelyn.com

To take the felt pumpkins and actually turn them into a garland (i.e. run a string through them), I cut out a tiny rectangle from the extra placement felt and glued the two ends of the rectangle to the back of the pumpkin, near the stem. I left the middle part of the rectangle unglued so I could thread through it.

Turning Felt Placemats into a DIY Pumpkin Garland evanandkatelyn.com

Turning Felt Placemats into a DIY Pumpkin Garland evanandkatelyn.com

I actually cut out the border of one of the placemats and used that as the string to thread the pumpkins together! Then I hung it over some art in our entry way, securing it by using binder clips to attach each end to the hanging wire on the back of the canvas. Very easy, and much more practical than using them as placements.

Turning Felt Placemats into a DIY Pumpkin Garland evanandkatelyn.com

Turning Felt Placemats into a DIY Pumpkin Garland evanandkatelyn.com

I could only fit three of the pumpkins across the art, so the fourth found its home in the middle of the “O” on our love letters. Luckily, he fit perfectly snug in there so he holds himself up, though if we needed to we could have suspended him using a little fishing line and tape.

Turning Felt Placemats into a DIY Pumpkin Garland evanandkatelyn.com

This project makes me think pretty much anything can be turned into a garland – black paper bats or tiny styrofoam pumpkins would be cute!

Turning Felt Placemats into a DIY Pumpkin Garland evanandkatelyn.com

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Upgrading Halloween Hurricanes with Copper Spray Paint

Are you guys still on a Halloween decor kick at your house? Because we are! But do you ever pull out decorations that you loved last year and think… meh? That’s the feeling that hit me, hence our three DIY pumpkin makeovers we posted earlier this week.

Aside from those pumpkins, there were a few more items in my Halloween decor bin that I had fallen out of love with.  So this is the first of a few quick and easy makeovers I did that will hopefully inspire you to take a second look at the decor you’re not crazy about any more.

First off, I had these black jack-o-lantern hurricanes I got at Target a few years ago that I honestly still really liked, but it was so hard to see their faces without a lit candle in there all the time. And with a kitty that likes to burn her whiskers on candles, that wasn’t an option for us. We also tried LED candles but they just weren’t bright/tall enough.

Upgrading Halloween Hurricanes with Copper Spray Paint evanandkatelyn.com

So I taped off their faces and tops (anything open really) and spray painted the insides copper using Krylon metallic paint. It was really quick to tape them off since you don’t have to be super exact.

Upgrading Halloween Hurricanes with Copper Spray Paint evanandkatelyn.com

Then I taped around the rim and added a plastic bag around the whole deal (I attached the plastic bag with the tape at the top rim).

Upgrading Halloween Hurricanes with Copper Spray Paint evanandkatelyn.com

Once they were fully protected, I sprayed away. Fun side note – when spraying spray paint into a cylinder, the spray floats out of the top like smoke. It was pretty cool looking, though damn near impossible to capture in a photo haha.

Upgrading Halloween Hurricanes with Copper Spray Paint evanandkatelyn.com

Now they look awesome! You can see their faces easily, and the copper + black combo is like a less in-your-face orange and black. Plus I love how the copper just barely got on the rim of the cut outs… it’s a nice little highlight.

Upgrading Halloween Hurricanes with Copper Spray Paint evanandkatelyn.com

Upgrading Halloween Hurricanes with Copper Spray Paint evanandkatelyn.com

I think a similar technique could be applied to other halloween decor like ceramic jack-o-lanterns or any type of candle holder with cut outs. Soon I’ll be posting a few more quick Halloween decor makeovers so keep an eye out!

Upgrading Halloween Hurricanes with Copper Spray Paint evanandkatelyn.com

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