Tag Archives | outdoor

Gut(ter) Reaction

Welp. Today’s post was supposed to be about how we’ve continued to update our patio. About how we bought some more furniture and lights on our path to turn it from just functional to functional AND pretty. Then we woke up to find it NOT functional and definitely NOT pretty.

When our gutter was ripped off, how we fixed our fascia boards - evanandkatelyn.com Yep. Not something you want to see as you’re headed out the door for work. A big storm blew through last night and knocked off over 20 feet of our gutter, bending it at a weak point and taking our fascia (the wood trim that caps off the ends of your rafters) with it. And it broke a strand of my lights darn it!

So yeah, not exactly the patio update we were planning on sharing with you guys… BUT the good news is we are earning +10 home exterior DIY skill points and we get to share what we’ve learned with you. Lesson #1: clean your gutters.

The other good news is I’m going to write this post as we go, so as of now as I’m typing, we are still in progress. Dunno how it’s gonna turn out yet. Kinda scary, kinda exciting, but we are all in this together!

Day 1:

So before we could leave for work, we had to address the 6 inch tall, 20+ foot long hole leading into our attic. You can see it in the photo above right under our roof line. We didn’t want rain getting it wet or squirrels letting themselves in, so we set to cover it up with plastic tarp til we could fully deal with it.

As we climbed up to take a closer look at the hole, we realized that the still-attached part of the gutter was starting to pull away too so we decided to cut off the detached piece (in retrospect we maybe shouldn’t have cut it since it may have been salvageable, we’re not sure though). We couldn’t find our flashing clippers so Evan grabbed his saw zaw. Then that died so we grabbed our jigsaw. Lesson #2: owning the right tools is great, but if you can’t find em or they’re not charged, they aren’t any good.

When our gutter was ripped off, how we fixed our fascia boards - evanandkatelyn.com By the time Evan got it cut he was covered in gutter juice.

2016-03-24 (1) But at least we didn’t have this hanging from our house anymore:

When our gutter was ripped off, how we fixed our fascia boards - evanandkatelyn.com Next we put up a strip of plastic tarp with a few quick tacks from our staple gun, called it a morning, and headed to work, leaving our patio looking like a war zone.

When our gutter was ripped off, how we fixed our fascia boards - evanandkatelyn.com After work Evan swung by Home Depot to get supplies and then pulled off the remaining few feet of gutter that was still attached to the house. Now that we had a clean slate, we could replace our fascia. Having a big hole running into our attic was no bueno, so our goal was to install new fascia by the end of the night. Since at this point we didn’t even know what fascia was (we’d just been calling it “siding under our roof”), we weren’t too hopeful haha.

2016-03-25 (2) But before we could add anything new, we needed to figure out what was going on with the hot mess we left behind.

When our gutter was ripped off, how we fixed our fascia boards - evanandkatelyn.com We just decided that anything that didn’t seem structurally sound we would cut off. Seems logical right? And here’s Evan using hedge clippers to trim the flashing above the wood. Still couldn’t find those metal clippers so we used what we had haha.

IMG_7498 Once we had all the bad stuff off we could start adding the new stuff. Time for power tools!

IMG_7503 IMG_7510 We saw that the existing boards were cut at 45 degrees so we did the same with our new boards. One at a time, we lined them up along the roof line and screwed in at every rafter tail. In the photo below you can see the hole into our attic and the rafter tails peeking out. And oh hi there soffit vent chutes, we remember installing you and almost stabbing our heads with roofing nails.

IMG_7504 So I held up the board on one end while Evan screwed it in on the other. Once we got a couple screws in I could let go and get the next piece ready.

When our gutter was ripped off, how we fixed our fascia boards - evanandkatelyn.com We noticed that under the old gutters there was a 1 inch thick piece of trim acting as a spacer between the top of the fascia and the gutter, so Evan had also picked up some trim on his Home Depot trip. It was getting dark at this point but you can sorta see the trim along the top of the board in the photo below after we screwed it in.

2016-03-24 (4) We were luckily able to finish our goal of replacing the fascia by the end of the night! It’s hard to see much in the photo, but it sure looks good to us :)

IMG_7513

Day 2:

With the hole to our attic officially closed off, we could sleep easy. The next day we hit our fascia with primer, caulk, and paint to really seal the deal. We read somewhere online that sometimes primer can help caulk stick to wood so we decided to do the primer first. We used Zinnser Cover Stain primer, which felt nice and solid.

IMG_7514 As the primer dried, I was on caulk duty. We used the same Dap Alex latex caulk from when we patched our siding out front and it worked just fine.

IMG_7518 After letting it dry for a couple hours, it was time to paint! I took first paint shift and thought it would be cool to take painting selfies. #shouldbeholdingontothatladder

2016-03-25 (4) When our gutter was ripped off, how we fixed our fascia boards - evanandkatelyn.com Then Evan got out there for shift 2 of painting. All in all this was the easy part so we don’t have too many photos. But we are super excited because now we are DONE with replacing the fascia, woooo!

IMG_7521 Just need to power wash the patio. And put up our lights. Oh yeah and add gutters! Well we can at least do one of those three things tonight.

IMG_7524 IMG_7528 We still need to do more research to see if we want to tackle installing gutters ourselves or hire it out. Looks like it’s not terribly complicated to DIY, but the downside of DIY-ing it is that you have to buy gutters in smaller sections (which is weaker) instead of getting a seamless run from a professional. So we will keep you guys posted! For now, it feels good to just not having a gaping hole leading to our attic. Have a great weekend guys!

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DIY Industrial Outdoor Bench

Hey y’all! As usual, work is crazy- crazy enough that we realized we have a few projects we totally spaced on and never posted about. One that we are super excited to share is our DIY bench!

We wanted to create some flexible additional seating that could be used inside or outside. So these were our requirements for the bench:

1) it had to be ok to use outdoors and indoors

2) it had to fit 2-3 people

3) it had to be relatively cheap and easy to make

We pictured in our mind something industrial looking using metal and wood. Basically we pictured this: (spoiler- it’s our finished bench)

DIY industrial bench - evanandkatelyn.com We went to Home Depot and found some aluminum angle stock that we could use for the legs/frame. Totally did not know that’s what it was called until writing this post, but hey we are all learning here! Anyways, this stuff is great because it’s lightweight, cheap, and rust-proof. Perfect!

For the top of our bench, we got some pressure treated wood. It’s a little more expensive than normal wood, but it will hold up outdoors against the elements so it was a must. And it’s fine to use indoors too unless you’re preparing food on it, which we didn’t plan on doing.

So first off, we decided what size we wanted our bench to be. Based on research of what’s out there, we decided about 4 ft wide by 10.5 inches deep (the depth of three 2×4’s) and 14 inches tall. So we measured out 4 legs and 4 pieces for the frame. The aluminum is pretty light/thin, so we were able to just cut it with our jigsaw.

IMG_6900 IMG_6902 We cut our legs first. And got really excited about it :D

IMG_6906 The cuts were pretty rough, but we sanded them down. You can see the difference between unsanded and sanded in the photo below.

IMG_6908 For the legs, we left the cuts at right angles. But for the frame pieces, we cut them at 45 degree angles for a nicer looking seam.

IMG_6922 Once our frame was cut we could see it coming together!

IMG_6921 We laid it upside down on the garage floor so that we could fit the legs into place. We tucked them inside each corner and used a sharpie to mark where we wanted to screw in the screws to hold it all together.

IMG_6924 Each leg was attached to 2 pieces of frame. In the photo below, you can see the leg (the vertical piece) and one side of the frame (see the 45 degree cut in the corner?). Hope this helps make sense of how everything was attached.

IMG_6929 IMG_6933 The awesome thing about this frame is it is so light!

DIY industrial bench - evanandkatelyn.com To add a little extra stability to the legs, we also took these flat aluminum pieces and attached them about 1/3 up the legs on both sides.

IMG_6942 Woohoo finished frame!

IMG_6945 Next up we tackled the wood we wanted to use for the top. I was on sanding duty while Evan made the cuts.

DIY industrial bench - evanandkatelyn.com We used three 2×4’s with a short trim piece on each end to finish it off, which we attached with pocket screws. We may have gone overboard with the pocket screws… but the kreg jig was still new at the time and we got excited.

IMG_6956 We set it on top of the frame to test the size… perfect fit!

DIY industrial bench - evanandkatelyn.com We took it one step further and gave it a nice stain.

IMG_6966 With the wooden top upside down on the ground, we sat the frame on top of it and screwed through the aluminum into the wood.

DIY industrial bench - evanandkatelyn.com

IMG_6973 And tada, finished bench!

IMG_6974 Not the most glorious completion photo since it was late at night in a dirty garage, so we got some nice photos of it where it used to live on our patio:

DIY industrial bench - evanandkatelyn.com And where it currently lives in front of our living room windows:

IMG_7428 DIY industrial bench - evanandkatelyn.com Evan even 3D printed some little feet for it so it doesn’t scratch our floors (you can see them in the photo above). But you could also use felt pads (or just not worry about the feet if it’s gonna live outside full time!)

Well there you have it! A simple industrial bench that was easy to build, can live inside or outside, and didn’t cost much at all.

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